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Social disorganization and history of child sexual abuse against girls in sub-Saharan Africa: a multilevel analysis.

Yahaya I, Uthman OA, Soares J, Macassa G - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2013)

Bottom Line: Less focus has been paid to the role of community level factors associated with CSA.We found that exposure to CSA was associated with high community level of family disruption, thus suggesting that neighbourhoods may indeed have significant important effects on exposure to CSA.Further studies are needed to explore pathways that connect the individual and neighbourhood levels, that is, means through which deleterious neighbourhood effects are transmitted to individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden. illyahaya@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a considerable public health problem. Less focus has been paid to the role of community level factors associated with CSA. The aim of this study was to examine the association between neighbourhood-level measures of social disorganization and CSA.

Methods: We applied multiple multilevel logistic regression analysis on Demographic and Health Survey data for 6,351 adolescents from six countries in sub-Saharan Africa between 2006 and 2008.

Results: The percentage of adolescents that had experienced CSA ranged from 1.04% to 5.84%. There was a significant variation in the odds of reporting CSA across the communities, suggesting 18% of the variation in CSA could be attributed to community level factors. Respondents currently employed were more likely to have reported CSA than those who were unemployed (odds ratio [OR]=2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48 to 2.83). Respondents from communities with a high family disruption rate were 57% more likely to have reported CSA (OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.16).

Conclusion: We found that exposure to CSA was associated with high community level of family disruption, thus suggesting that neighbourhoods may indeed have significant important effects on exposure to CSA. Further studies are needed to explore pathways that connect the individual and neighbourhood levels, that is, means through which deleterious neighbourhood effects are transmitted to individuals.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Description of demographic and health surveys data 2006–2008 in Sub-Saharan Africa by country, survey year, sample size, eligible sample and reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA).
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Figure 1: Description of demographic and health surveys data 2006–2008 in Sub-Saharan Africa by country, survey year, sample size, eligible sample and reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA).

Mentions: The countries, survey year and eligible samples are shown in Figure 1. The surveys were conducted between 2006 and 2008. The number of adolescents (18 years or younger) included in the study who were permanent residence of the place at the time of the survey ranged from 477 in Ghana and 2,956 in Nigeria. The number of communities sampled ranged from as few as 300 in Liberia to as many as 888 in Nigeria. The percentage of adolescents that had experienced CSA ranged from 1.04% in Liberia to 5.84% in Zambia. Table 1 shows the characteristics of the covariates and association with CSA. Almost half (47%) of the respondents included in the final pooled sample were from Nigeria. Most of the adolescents were not married (88%); had secondary or higher education (56%), and not working (68%). There was significant association between CSA, marital status, occupation and education, but not with wealth status. The test of overall differences in prevalence of reported CSA among the six countries showed that the differential in reported CSA across the countries was statistically significant (chi-squared test [degree of freedom 5] =45.2, p=0.0001).


Social disorganization and history of child sexual abuse against girls in sub-Saharan Africa: a multilevel analysis.

Yahaya I, Uthman OA, Soares J, Macassa G - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2013)

Description of demographic and health surveys data 2006–2008 in Sub-Saharan Africa by country, survey year, sample size, eligible sample and reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750477&req=5

Figure 1: Description of demographic and health surveys data 2006–2008 in Sub-Saharan Africa by country, survey year, sample size, eligible sample and reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA).
Mentions: The countries, survey year and eligible samples are shown in Figure 1. The surveys were conducted between 2006 and 2008. The number of adolescents (18 years or younger) included in the study who were permanent residence of the place at the time of the survey ranged from 477 in Ghana and 2,956 in Nigeria. The number of communities sampled ranged from as few as 300 in Liberia to as many as 888 in Nigeria. The percentage of adolescents that had experienced CSA ranged from 1.04% in Liberia to 5.84% in Zambia. Table 1 shows the characteristics of the covariates and association with CSA. Almost half (47%) of the respondents included in the final pooled sample were from Nigeria. Most of the adolescents were not married (88%); had secondary or higher education (56%), and not working (68%). There was significant association between CSA, marital status, occupation and education, but not with wealth status. The test of overall differences in prevalence of reported CSA among the six countries showed that the differential in reported CSA across the countries was statistically significant (chi-squared test [degree of freedom 5] =45.2, p=0.0001).

Bottom Line: Less focus has been paid to the role of community level factors associated with CSA.We found that exposure to CSA was associated with high community level of family disruption, thus suggesting that neighbourhoods may indeed have significant important effects on exposure to CSA.Further studies are needed to explore pathways that connect the individual and neighbourhood levels, that is, means through which deleterious neighbourhood effects are transmitted to individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden. illyahaya@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a considerable public health problem. Less focus has been paid to the role of community level factors associated with CSA. The aim of this study was to examine the association between neighbourhood-level measures of social disorganization and CSA.

Methods: We applied multiple multilevel logistic regression analysis on Demographic and Health Survey data for 6,351 adolescents from six countries in sub-Saharan Africa between 2006 and 2008.

Results: The percentage of adolescents that had experienced CSA ranged from 1.04% to 5.84%. There was a significant variation in the odds of reporting CSA across the communities, suggesting 18% of the variation in CSA could be attributed to community level factors. Respondents currently employed were more likely to have reported CSA than those who were unemployed (odds ratio [OR]=2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48 to 2.83). Respondents from communities with a high family disruption rate were 57% more likely to have reported CSA (OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.16).

Conclusion: We found that exposure to CSA was associated with high community level of family disruption, thus suggesting that neighbourhoods may indeed have significant important effects on exposure to CSA. Further studies are needed to explore pathways that connect the individual and neighbourhood levels, that is, means through which deleterious neighbourhood effects are transmitted to individuals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus