Limits...
Decision maker perceptions of resource allocation processes in Canadian health care organizations: a national survey.

Smith N, Mitton C, Bryan S, Davidson A, Urquhart B, Gibson JL, Peacock S, Donaldson C - BMC Health Serv Res (2013)

Bottom Line: About one-half of respondents indicated that their organization used a formal process for resource allocation, while the others reported that political or historical factors were predominant.This paper explores these findings in greater detail and assesses them in context of the larger literature.Data from this large-scale cross-jurisdictional survey helps to illustrate common challenges and areas of positive performance among Canada's health system leadership teams.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, 7th floor, 828 W 10 Avenue, V5Z1M9, Vancouver, BC, Canada. neale.smith@ubc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Resource allocation is a key challenge for healthcare decision makers. While several case studies of organizational practice exist, there have been few large-scale cross-organization comparisons.

Methods: Between January and April 2011, we conducted an on-line survey of senior decision makers within regional health authorities (and closely equivalent organizations) across all Canadian provinces and territories. We received returns from 92 individual managers, from 60 out of 89 organizations in total. The survey inquired about structures, process features, and behaviours related to organization-wide resource allocation decisions. We focus here on three main aspects: type of process, perceived fairness, and overall rating.

Results: About one-half of respondents indicated that their organization used a formal process for resource allocation, while the others reported that political or historical factors were predominant. Seventy percent (70%) of respondents self-reported that their resource allocation process was fair and just over one-half assessed their process as 'good' or 'very good'. This paper explores these findings in greater detail and assesses them in context of the larger literature.

Conclusion: Data from this large-scale cross-jurisdictional survey helps to illustrate common challenges and areas of positive performance among Canada's health system leadership teams.

Show MeSH
Characteristics of priority setting processes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750381&req=5

Figure 1: Characteristics of priority setting processes.

Mentions: We then asked respondents to identify whether or not their organization-wide resource allocation process involved up to 11 elements – identified from the literature – which might be characterized as formalization (See Figure 1). As a group, those who indicated that their organization used primarily a formal process selected on average a larger number of these features: 3.8 compared to 2.8. This suggests that practice within organizations with a ‘formal’ process in fact may differ from that in other organizations. However, it may be that, due to the sequencing of these questions, respondents who stated they used a formal process may have felt compelled to choose more features as justification for this claim.


Decision maker perceptions of resource allocation processes in Canadian health care organizations: a national survey.

Smith N, Mitton C, Bryan S, Davidson A, Urquhart B, Gibson JL, Peacock S, Donaldson C - BMC Health Serv Res (2013)

Characteristics of priority setting processes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750381&req=5

Figure 1: Characteristics of priority setting processes.
Mentions: We then asked respondents to identify whether or not their organization-wide resource allocation process involved up to 11 elements – identified from the literature – which might be characterized as formalization (See Figure 1). As a group, those who indicated that their organization used primarily a formal process selected on average a larger number of these features: 3.8 compared to 2.8. This suggests that practice within organizations with a ‘formal’ process in fact may differ from that in other organizations. However, it may be that, due to the sequencing of these questions, respondents who stated they used a formal process may have felt compelled to choose more features as justification for this claim.

Bottom Line: About one-half of respondents indicated that their organization used a formal process for resource allocation, while the others reported that political or historical factors were predominant.This paper explores these findings in greater detail and assesses them in context of the larger literature.Data from this large-scale cross-jurisdictional survey helps to illustrate common challenges and areas of positive performance among Canada's health system leadership teams.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, 7th floor, 828 W 10 Avenue, V5Z1M9, Vancouver, BC, Canada. neale.smith@ubc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Resource allocation is a key challenge for healthcare decision makers. While several case studies of organizational practice exist, there have been few large-scale cross-organization comparisons.

Methods: Between January and April 2011, we conducted an on-line survey of senior decision makers within regional health authorities (and closely equivalent organizations) across all Canadian provinces and territories. We received returns from 92 individual managers, from 60 out of 89 organizations in total. The survey inquired about structures, process features, and behaviours related to organization-wide resource allocation decisions. We focus here on three main aspects: type of process, perceived fairness, and overall rating.

Results: About one-half of respondents indicated that their organization used a formal process for resource allocation, while the others reported that political or historical factors were predominant. Seventy percent (70%) of respondents self-reported that their resource allocation process was fair and just over one-half assessed their process as 'good' or 'very good'. This paper explores these findings in greater detail and assesses them in context of the larger literature.

Conclusion: Data from this large-scale cross-jurisdictional survey helps to illustrate common challenges and areas of positive performance among Canada's health system leadership teams.

Show MeSH