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Priorities for research and control of cestode zoonoses in Asia.

Xiao N, Yao JW, Ding W, Giraudoux P, Craig PS, Ito A - Infect Dis Poverty (2013)

Bottom Line: Among all neglected zoonotic diseases, cestode zoonoses account for over 75% of global disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost.It brought together 96 scientists from the Asian region and beyond to exchange ideas, report on progress, make a gap analysis, and distill prioritizing settings with a focus on the Asian region.Key objectives of this international symposium were to agree on solutions to accelerate progress towards decreasing transmission, and human mortality and morbidity caused by the three major cestode zoonoses (cystic echinococcosis, alveolar echinococcosis, and cysticercosis); to critically assess the potential to control these diseases; to establish a research and validation agenda on existing and new approaches; and to report on novel tools for the study and control of cestode zoonoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; WHO Collaborative Center for Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Filariasis; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai 200025, People's Republic of China. xiao.ning@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Globally, cestode zoonoses cause serious public health problems, particularly in Asia. Among all neglected zoonotic diseases, cestode zoonoses account for over 75% of global disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. An international symposium on cestode zoonoses research and control was held in Shanghai, China between 28th and 30th October 2012 in order to establish joint efforts to study and research effective approaches to control these zoonoses. It brought together 96 scientists from the Asian region and beyond to exchange ideas, report on progress, make a gap analysis, and distill prioritizing settings with a focus on the Asian region. Key objectives of this international symposium were to agree on solutions to accelerate progress towards decreasing transmission, and human mortality and morbidity caused by the three major cestode zoonoses (cystic echinococcosis, alveolar echinococcosis, and cysticercosis); to critically assess the potential to control these diseases; to establish a research and validation agenda on existing and new approaches; and to report on novel tools for the study and control of cestode zoonoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Taenia worms collected from a Tibetan agricultural village.Key:A: the worms expelled from a Tibetan girl. B: the worms collected from villagers.
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Figure 1: Taenia worms collected from a Tibetan agricultural village.Key:A: the worms expelled from a Tibetan girl. B: the worms collected from villagers.

Mentions: Regarding human taeniasis, results from village-based studies in Tibetan communities of southwest China demonstrated that the three human Taenia species were co-endemic in farming areas, where neurocysticercosis is an emerging public health concern (see FigureĀ 1). Overall infection rate of taeniasis ranged from 3-20% and seroprevalence of human cysticercosis varied from 4-7% [29,30]. Some participants reported the situation of taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans and livestock in Asian countries, including an infection survey which surprisingly showed that T. asiatica was reported in 25 confirmed patients in Japan and linked to the consumption of raw pig liver. However the origins of the taeniasis cluster could not be identified due to a lack of geographical variations in the DNA markers used [31].


Priorities for research and control of cestode zoonoses in Asia.

Xiao N, Yao JW, Ding W, Giraudoux P, Craig PS, Ito A - Infect Dis Poverty (2013)

Taenia worms collected from a Tibetan agricultural village.Key:A: the worms expelled from a Tibetan girl. B: the worms collected from villagers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750256&req=5

Figure 1: Taenia worms collected from a Tibetan agricultural village.Key:A: the worms expelled from a Tibetan girl. B: the worms collected from villagers.
Mentions: Regarding human taeniasis, results from village-based studies in Tibetan communities of southwest China demonstrated that the three human Taenia species were co-endemic in farming areas, where neurocysticercosis is an emerging public health concern (see FigureĀ 1). Overall infection rate of taeniasis ranged from 3-20% and seroprevalence of human cysticercosis varied from 4-7% [29,30]. Some participants reported the situation of taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans and livestock in Asian countries, including an infection survey which surprisingly showed that T. asiatica was reported in 25 confirmed patients in Japan and linked to the consumption of raw pig liver. However the origins of the taeniasis cluster could not be identified due to a lack of geographical variations in the DNA markers used [31].

Bottom Line: Among all neglected zoonotic diseases, cestode zoonoses account for over 75% of global disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost.It brought together 96 scientists from the Asian region and beyond to exchange ideas, report on progress, make a gap analysis, and distill prioritizing settings with a focus on the Asian region.Key objectives of this international symposium were to agree on solutions to accelerate progress towards decreasing transmission, and human mortality and morbidity caused by the three major cestode zoonoses (cystic echinococcosis, alveolar echinococcosis, and cysticercosis); to critically assess the potential to control these diseases; to establish a research and validation agenda on existing and new approaches; and to report on novel tools for the study and control of cestode zoonoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; WHO Collaborative Center for Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Filariasis; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai 200025, People's Republic of China. xiao.ning@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Globally, cestode zoonoses cause serious public health problems, particularly in Asia. Among all neglected zoonotic diseases, cestode zoonoses account for over 75% of global disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. An international symposium on cestode zoonoses research and control was held in Shanghai, China between 28th and 30th October 2012 in order to establish joint efforts to study and research effective approaches to control these zoonoses. It brought together 96 scientists from the Asian region and beyond to exchange ideas, report on progress, make a gap analysis, and distill prioritizing settings with a focus on the Asian region. Key objectives of this international symposium were to agree on solutions to accelerate progress towards decreasing transmission, and human mortality and morbidity caused by the three major cestode zoonoses (cystic echinococcosis, alveolar echinococcosis, and cysticercosis); to critically assess the potential to control these diseases; to establish a research and validation agenda on existing and new approaches; and to report on novel tools for the study and control of cestode zoonoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus