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Does "crisis-induced intermittency" explain bipolar disorder dynamics?

Hadaeghi F, Hashemi Golpayegani MR, Moradi K - Front Comput Neurosci (2013)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Amirkabir University of Technology Tehran, Iran.

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According to such paradigm, the brain could be considered as a complex system with chaos as its predominant dynamics... As a result, concepts of complex system and chaos theory could be applied to the studies of normal and abnormal brain functions... One of the fundamental features of some complex systems is “multistability,” which can be understood as the coexistence of several interacting attractors (Chian et al., )... These interactions results in various complex behaviors in the long term dynamics of the system... From the perspective of chaos theory, irregular alternation between episodes of various forms of chaotic or periodic behaviors is known as “intermittency” (Tanaka et al., ; Chian et al., )... Therefore, such accidental and abrupt changes of the mood state in bipolar disorder can result from the collision of the initial mood trajectory with the boundary of the basin of the attraction of the another mood attractors... According to chaos theory, this intermittent behavioral pattern could be considered as “crisis-induced intermittency. ” Following such viewpoint, in healthy subjects, there would be only one “strange attractor” related to the mood states... Time series of such strange attractor represents both positive and negative emotions, unpredictably and in response to internal (for example thought, attention and memory) or external (environment) stimulus... In a bipolar person, however, initial emotional trigger of disease results in a type of “exterior crisis” in the system, in which the destruction of strange attractor is accompanied with formation of two abnormal attractors (mania and depression) and chaotic transients between them... In order to model such scenario, models of chaotic systems which demonstrate various kind of crisis by changing their parameters (such as “forced Duffing” oscillator and “Ikeda” iterated map), could be utilized to characterize the basic features of human emotional states, when they are presenting multistable and intermittent behaviors, as in the case of bipolar disorder... The proposed theoretical model would be useful in order to predict the evolution of such emotional states in bipolar disorder and to investigate the effects of psychopharmacological therapies... The experimental data for such investigations would most likely come from psychological tests, life chart recordings, or functional studies, such as EEG, fMRI, or PET-scan.

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(A) Example of crisis induced intermittency in the forced Duffing oscillator. (B) Example of temporal pattern of mood variation in a patient with bipolar disorder (Tretter et al., 2011).
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Figure 1: (A) Example of crisis induced intermittency in the forced Duffing oscillator. (B) Example of temporal pattern of mood variation in a patient with bipolar disorder (Tretter et al., 2011).

Mentions: In order to model such scenario, models of chaotic systems which demonstrate various kind of crisis by changing their parameters (such as “forced Duffing” oscillator and “Ikeda” iterated map), could be utilized to characterize the basic features of human emotional states, when they are presenting multistable and intermittent behaviors, as in the case of bipolar disorder. In order to provide a deeper insight in to such dynamics, we represent the time series of forced Duffing oscillator in its crisis-induced intermittent mode in Figure 1A and an example of temporal pattern of self-rated mood records (life charts) in a person with bipolar disorder in Figure 1B. The proposed theoretical model would be useful in order to predict the evolution of such emotional states in bipolar disorder and to investigate the effects of psychopharmacological therapies. The experimental data for such investigations would most likely come from psychological tests, life chart recordings, or functional studies, such as EEG, fMRI, or PET-scan.


Does "crisis-induced intermittency" explain bipolar disorder dynamics?

Hadaeghi F, Hashemi Golpayegani MR, Moradi K - Front Comput Neurosci (2013)

(A) Example of crisis induced intermittency in the forced Duffing oscillator. (B) Example of temporal pattern of mood variation in a patient with bipolar disorder (Tretter et al., 2011).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750208&req=5

Figure 1: (A) Example of crisis induced intermittency in the forced Duffing oscillator. (B) Example of temporal pattern of mood variation in a patient with bipolar disorder (Tretter et al., 2011).
Mentions: In order to model such scenario, models of chaotic systems which demonstrate various kind of crisis by changing their parameters (such as “forced Duffing” oscillator and “Ikeda” iterated map), could be utilized to characterize the basic features of human emotional states, when they are presenting multistable and intermittent behaviors, as in the case of bipolar disorder. In order to provide a deeper insight in to such dynamics, we represent the time series of forced Duffing oscillator in its crisis-induced intermittent mode in Figure 1A and an example of temporal pattern of self-rated mood records (life charts) in a person with bipolar disorder in Figure 1B. The proposed theoretical model would be useful in order to predict the evolution of such emotional states in bipolar disorder and to investigate the effects of psychopharmacological therapies. The experimental data for such investigations would most likely come from psychological tests, life chart recordings, or functional studies, such as EEG, fMRI, or PET-scan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Amirkabir University of Technology Tehran, Iran.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

According to such paradigm, the brain could be considered as a complex system with chaos as its predominant dynamics... As a result, concepts of complex system and chaos theory could be applied to the studies of normal and abnormal brain functions... One of the fundamental features of some complex systems is “multistability,” which can be understood as the coexistence of several interacting attractors (Chian et al., )... These interactions results in various complex behaviors in the long term dynamics of the system... From the perspective of chaos theory, irregular alternation between episodes of various forms of chaotic or periodic behaviors is known as “intermittency” (Tanaka et al., ; Chian et al., )... Therefore, such accidental and abrupt changes of the mood state in bipolar disorder can result from the collision of the initial mood trajectory with the boundary of the basin of the attraction of the another mood attractors... According to chaos theory, this intermittent behavioral pattern could be considered as “crisis-induced intermittency. ” Following such viewpoint, in healthy subjects, there would be only one “strange attractor” related to the mood states... Time series of such strange attractor represents both positive and negative emotions, unpredictably and in response to internal (for example thought, attention and memory) or external (environment) stimulus... In a bipolar person, however, initial emotional trigger of disease results in a type of “exterior crisis” in the system, in which the destruction of strange attractor is accompanied with formation of two abnormal attractors (mania and depression) and chaotic transients between them... In order to model such scenario, models of chaotic systems which demonstrate various kind of crisis by changing their parameters (such as “forced Duffing” oscillator and “Ikeda” iterated map), could be utilized to characterize the basic features of human emotional states, when they are presenting multistable and intermittent behaviors, as in the case of bipolar disorder... The proposed theoretical model would be useful in order to predict the evolution of such emotional states in bipolar disorder and to investigate the effects of psychopharmacological therapies... The experimental data for such investigations would most likely come from psychological tests, life chart recordings, or functional studies, such as EEG, fMRI, or PET-scan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus