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Social exclusion modulates fairness consideration in the ultimatum game: an ERP study.

Qu C, Wang Y, Huang Y - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers.This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation.These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Center, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous neuroimaging research has identified brain regions activated when people's fairness consideration changes under conditions of social exclusion. The current study used EEG data to examine the temporal process of changes in fairness consideration under social exclusion. In this study, a Cyberball game was administered to manipulate participants' social exclusion or inclusion. Then, in the following Ultimatum game (UG), participants' brain potentials were recorded while they received fair/unfair offers from someone who previously excluded them, someone who previously included them, or a stranger. Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers. Moreover, the FRN was more negative-going in response to unfair offers from people who previously excluded them than from the includer and the stranger. Fair offers elicited a larger P300 than unfair offers. In addition, P300 was more positive-going for unfair offers from the stranger than from the excluder and the includer. This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation. These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sequence of events in a single trial in the ultimatum game.
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Figure 2: Sequence of events in a single trial in the ultimatum game.

Mentions: The time course of a trial is illustrated in Figure 2. Each trial was initiated with the presentation of a 100 Yuan (about $15) bill for 1000 ms duration. Subsequently, the sentence “The computer is randomly pairing” in Chinese was presented (800~1200 ms), suggesting that the other person was randomly selected to play as an allocator in the current round of the game. Then the allocator’s head portrait was presented at the center of the screen for 1000 ms. After the word “offered you” in Chinese was presented for 1000~1500 ms the amount was shown to the recipient, and the participants were asked to choose “accept” or “reject” by pressing the “F” or “J” key on the keyboard. The next trial began 1 second after the offset of the feedback.


Social exclusion modulates fairness consideration in the ultimatum game: an ERP study.

Qu C, Wang Y, Huang Y - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Sequence of events in a single trial in the ultimatum game.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750207&req=5

Figure 2: Sequence of events in a single trial in the ultimatum game.
Mentions: The time course of a trial is illustrated in Figure 2. Each trial was initiated with the presentation of a 100 Yuan (about $15) bill for 1000 ms duration. Subsequently, the sentence “The computer is randomly pairing” in Chinese was presented (800~1200 ms), suggesting that the other person was randomly selected to play as an allocator in the current round of the game. Then the allocator’s head portrait was presented at the center of the screen for 1000 ms. After the word “offered you” in Chinese was presented for 1000~1500 ms the amount was shown to the recipient, and the participants were asked to choose “accept” or “reject” by pressing the “F” or “J” key on the keyboard. The next trial began 1 second after the offset of the feedback.

Bottom Line: Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers.This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation.These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Center, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous neuroimaging research has identified brain regions activated when people's fairness consideration changes under conditions of social exclusion. The current study used EEG data to examine the temporal process of changes in fairness consideration under social exclusion. In this study, a Cyberball game was administered to manipulate participants' social exclusion or inclusion. Then, in the following Ultimatum game (UG), participants' brain potentials were recorded while they received fair/unfair offers from someone who previously excluded them, someone who previously included them, or a stranger. Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers. Moreover, the FRN was more negative-going in response to unfair offers from people who previously excluded them than from the includer and the stranger. Fair offers elicited a larger P300 than unfair offers. In addition, P300 was more positive-going for unfair offers from the stranger than from the excluder and the includer. This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation. These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus