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Social exclusion modulates fairness consideration in the ultimatum game: an ERP study.

Qu C, Wang Y, Huang Y - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers.This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation.These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Center, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous neuroimaging research has identified brain regions activated when people's fairness consideration changes under conditions of social exclusion. The current study used EEG data to examine the temporal process of changes in fairness consideration under social exclusion. In this study, a Cyberball game was administered to manipulate participants' social exclusion or inclusion. Then, in the following Ultimatum game (UG), participants' brain potentials were recorded while they received fair/unfair offers from someone who previously excluded them, someone who previously included them, or a stranger. Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers. Moreover, the FRN was more negative-going in response to unfair offers from people who previously excluded them than from the includer and the stranger. Fair offers elicited a larger P300 than unfair offers. In addition, P300 was more positive-going for unfair offers from the stranger than from the excluder and the includer. This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation. These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshot of a Cyberball game interface. Participants are represented by a cartoon hand at the bottom of the screen, and the other two (fictional) players’ photographs are shown in the upper corners of the screen.
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Figure 1: Screenshot of a Cyberball game interface. Participants are represented by a cartoon hand at the bottom of the screen, and the other two (fictional) players’ photographs are shown in the upper corners of the screen.

Mentions: During Cyberball, participants played an animated ball-tossing game. The photographs of the other (fictitious) players were displayed as animated cartoon hands at the top of the screen (Figure 1). In order to control for gender effects, everyone believed they were playing with same-gender players. There were 30 throws of the ball in the inclusion condition, and 30 in the exclusion condition. In the inclusion condition, participants were thrown the ball approximately half the time by each of the other two players. Once receiving the ball, participants could throw the ball back to one of the players by clicking the mouse. Participants were then told that they would play a similar game with two novel players, which in fact were two new fictitious partners. This next game was the exclusion game. After two initial throws, participants were not thrown the ball again.


Social exclusion modulates fairness consideration in the ultimatum game: an ERP study.

Qu C, Wang Y, Huang Y - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Screenshot of a Cyberball game interface. Participants are represented by a cartoon hand at the bottom of the screen, and the other two (fictional) players’ photographs are shown in the upper corners of the screen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750207&req=5

Figure 1: Screenshot of a Cyberball game interface. Participants are represented by a cartoon hand at the bottom of the screen, and the other two (fictional) players’ photographs are shown in the upper corners of the screen.
Mentions: During Cyberball, participants played an animated ball-tossing game. The photographs of the other (fictitious) players were displayed as animated cartoon hands at the top of the screen (Figure 1). In order to control for gender effects, everyone believed they were playing with same-gender players. There were 30 throws of the ball in the inclusion condition, and 30 in the exclusion condition. In the inclusion condition, participants were thrown the ball approximately half the time by each of the other two players. Once receiving the ball, participants could throw the ball back to one of the players by clicking the mouse. Participants were then told that they would play a similar game with two novel players, which in fact were two new fictitious partners. This next game was the exclusion game. After two initial throws, participants were not thrown the ball again.

Bottom Line: Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers.This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation.These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Center, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous neuroimaging research has identified brain regions activated when people's fairness consideration changes under conditions of social exclusion. The current study used EEG data to examine the temporal process of changes in fairness consideration under social exclusion. In this study, a Cyberball game was administered to manipulate participants' social exclusion or inclusion. Then, in the following Ultimatum game (UG), participants' brain potentials were recorded while they received fair/unfair offers from someone who previously excluded them, someone who previously included them, or a stranger. Results showed that feedback-related negativity (FRN) after onset of distribution outcome was more pronounced for unfair offers compared to fair offers. Moreover, the FRN was more negative-going in response to unfair offers from people who previously excluded them than from the includer and the stranger. Fair offers elicited a larger P300 than unfair offers. In addition, P300 was more positive-going for unfair offers from the stranger than from the excluder and the includer. This study reveals a temporal process in which the effects of social exclusion on fair consideration are reflected in FRN in the early stage of outcome evaluation. These data also suggest that the FRN is modulated by the subjective evaluation of outcome events in a social context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus