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Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

Leon-Cabrera S, Solís-Lozano L, Suárez-Álvarez K, González-Chávez A, Béjar YL, Robles-Díaz G, Escobedo G - Front Integr Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583).These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects.Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción y Clínica de Desórdenes de Sueño, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa D.F., México.

ABSTRACT
Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical correlation of the serum levels of leptin with fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, and insulin resistance. Serum concentrations of leptin exhibited a positive significant relationship with high levels of glucose (A) and insulin (B), as well increased insulin resistance (C). The level of insulin resistance was estimated using the HOMA-IR index, which results of multiplying fasting insulin concentration (mU/L) by fasting glucose concentration (mmol/L), then divided by the constant 22.5. Coefficients (r) and P-values were calculated by the Spearman's correlation model. The correlation level was considered significant when p < 0.05.
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Figure 3: Statistical correlation of the serum levels of leptin with fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, and insulin resistance. Serum concentrations of leptin exhibited a positive significant relationship with high levels of glucose (A) and insulin (B), as well increased insulin resistance (C). The level of insulin resistance was estimated using the HOMA-IR index, which results of multiplying fasting insulin concentration (mU/L) by fasting glucose concentration (mmol/L), then divided by the constant 22.5. Coefficients (r) and P-values were calculated by the Spearman's correlation model. The correlation level was considered significant when p < 0.05.

Mentions: As expected, our results show that circulating levels of leptin increase with obesity-related anthropometric parameters. Indeed, leptin was significantly correlated with increased BMI (r = 0.4173, p = 0.0001), central obesity (r = 0.4678, p < 0.0001), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583, p = 0.0010) (Figures 2A–C, respectively). Furthermore, leptin also exhibited a clear association with parameters of metabolic alteration. In this sense, serum leptin was significantly related with increased levels of blood glucose (r = 0.5227, p < 0.0001) and insulin (r = 0.2229, p = 0.0455) (Figures 3A,B, respectively). There was also a significant relationship between leptin and the level of insulin resistance, estimated by means of the HOMA-IR (r = 0.3611, p < 0.0009) (Figure 3C). Interestingly, leptin had a positive association with increased triglyceride levels (r = 0.4135, p = 0.0001), but not with total cholesterol (Figures 4A,B, respectively).


Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

Leon-Cabrera S, Solís-Lozano L, Suárez-Álvarez K, González-Chávez A, Béjar YL, Robles-Díaz G, Escobedo G - Front Integr Neurosci (2013)

Statistical correlation of the serum levels of leptin with fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, and insulin resistance. Serum concentrations of leptin exhibited a positive significant relationship with high levels of glucose (A) and insulin (B), as well increased insulin resistance (C). The level of insulin resistance was estimated using the HOMA-IR index, which results of multiplying fasting insulin concentration (mU/L) by fasting glucose concentration (mmol/L), then divided by the constant 22.5. Coefficients (r) and P-values were calculated by the Spearman's correlation model. The correlation level was considered significant when p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750204&req=5

Figure 3: Statistical correlation of the serum levels of leptin with fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, and insulin resistance. Serum concentrations of leptin exhibited a positive significant relationship with high levels of glucose (A) and insulin (B), as well increased insulin resistance (C). The level of insulin resistance was estimated using the HOMA-IR index, which results of multiplying fasting insulin concentration (mU/L) by fasting glucose concentration (mmol/L), then divided by the constant 22.5. Coefficients (r) and P-values were calculated by the Spearman's correlation model. The correlation level was considered significant when p < 0.05.
Mentions: As expected, our results show that circulating levels of leptin increase with obesity-related anthropometric parameters. Indeed, leptin was significantly correlated with increased BMI (r = 0.4173, p = 0.0001), central obesity (r = 0.4678, p < 0.0001), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583, p = 0.0010) (Figures 2A–C, respectively). Furthermore, leptin also exhibited a clear association with parameters of metabolic alteration. In this sense, serum leptin was significantly related with increased levels of blood glucose (r = 0.5227, p < 0.0001) and insulin (r = 0.2229, p = 0.0455) (Figures 3A,B, respectively). There was also a significant relationship between leptin and the level of insulin resistance, estimated by means of the HOMA-IR (r = 0.3611, p < 0.0009) (Figure 3C). Interestingly, leptin had a positive association with increased triglyceride levels (r = 0.4135, p = 0.0001), but not with total cholesterol (Figures 4A,B, respectively).

Bottom Line: As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583).These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects.Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción y Clínica de Desórdenes de Sueño, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa D.F., México.

ABSTRACT
Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus