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Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

Leon-Cabrera S, Solís-Lozano L, Suárez-Álvarez K, González-Chávez A, Béjar YL, Robles-Díaz G, Escobedo G - Front Integr Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583).These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects.Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción y Clínica de Desórdenes de Sueño, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa D.F., México.

ABSTRACT
Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum levels of leptin in obese and non-obese individuals. (A) Circulating leptin levels were assessed in normal weight and obese subjects, defining obesity according to the World Health Organization criteria for body mass index. In our study population, serum leptin was also evaluated in terms of abdominal obesity (B). For women, abdominal obesity was considered when the waist circumference was 80 cm or higher, whereas for men, it was considered when the waist circumference was 94 cm or higher. Data are expressed as mean ± S. E. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.05.
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Figure 1: Serum levels of leptin in obese and non-obese individuals. (A) Circulating leptin levels were assessed in normal weight and obese subjects, defining obesity according to the World Health Organization criteria for body mass index. In our study population, serum leptin was also evaluated in terms of abdominal obesity (B). For women, abdominal obesity was considered when the waist circumference was 80 cm or higher, whereas for men, it was considered when the waist circumference was 94 cm or higher. Data are expressed as mean ± S. E. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.05.

Mentions: In accordance with previous reports, circulating levels of leptin were significantly increased in obese subjects when comparing to non-obese control individuals. In terms of BMI, leptin exhibited a significant 1.5-fold increase in obese subjects as comparing with normal weight controls (Figure 1A). In obese individuals, the mean value of leptin was 1256.1 ± 207.7 ng/mL, whereas in the non-obese group it was around 812.1 ± 417.8 ng/mL (Figure 1A). Interestingly, serum values of leptin still showed a significant elevation when examining in subjects with abdominal obesity (Figure 1B). For this case, the mean value of leptin in subjects with abdominal obesity was 1141.8 ± 343.6 ng/mL, while it decreased to 858.3 ± 419.6 ng/mL in individuals exhibiting a normal waist perimeter (Figure 1B).


Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

Leon-Cabrera S, Solís-Lozano L, Suárez-Álvarez K, González-Chávez A, Béjar YL, Robles-Díaz G, Escobedo G - Front Integr Neurosci (2013)

Serum levels of leptin in obese and non-obese individuals. (A) Circulating leptin levels were assessed in normal weight and obese subjects, defining obesity according to the World Health Organization criteria for body mass index. In our study population, serum leptin was also evaluated in terms of abdominal obesity (B). For women, abdominal obesity was considered when the waist circumference was 80 cm or higher, whereas for men, it was considered when the waist circumference was 94 cm or higher. Data are expressed as mean ± S. E. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750204&req=5

Figure 1: Serum levels of leptin in obese and non-obese individuals. (A) Circulating leptin levels were assessed in normal weight and obese subjects, defining obesity according to the World Health Organization criteria for body mass index. In our study population, serum leptin was also evaluated in terms of abdominal obesity (B). For women, abdominal obesity was considered when the waist circumference was 80 cm or higher, whereas for men, it was considered when the waist circumference was 94 cm or higher. Data are expressed as mean ± S. E. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.05.
Mentions: In accordance with previous reports, circulating levels of leptin were significantly increased in obese subjects when comparing to non-obese control individuals. In terms of BMI, leptin exhibited a significant 1.5-fold increase in obese subjects as comparing with normal weight controls (Figure 1A). In obese individuals, the mean value of leptin was 1256.1 ± 207.7 ng/mL, whereas in the non-obese group it was around 812.1 ± 417.8 ng/mL (Figure 1A). Interestingly, serum values of leptin still showed a significant elevation when examining in subjects with abdominal obesity (Figure 1B). For this case, the mean value of leptin in subjects with abdominal obesity was 1141.8 ± 343.6 ng/mL, while it decreased to 858.3 ± 419.6 ng/mL in individuals exhibiting a normal waist perimeter (Figure 1B).

Bottom Line: As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583).These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects.Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción y Clínica de Desórdenes de Sueño, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa D.F., México.

ABSTRACT
Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus