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Viral etiology and clinical profiles of children with severe acute respiratory infections in China.

Zhang C, Zhu N, Xie Z, Lu R, He B, Liu C, Ma X, Tan W - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05).Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05).RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Medical Virology, Ministry of Health, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: No comprehensive analysis is available on the viral etiology and clinical characterization among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in China during 2009 H1N1 pandemic and post-pandemic period.

Methods: Cohort of 370 hospitalized children (1 to 72 months) with SARI from May 2008 to March 2010 was enrolled in this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens were tested by a commercial assay for 18 respiratory viral targets. The viral distribution and its association with clinical character were statistically analyzed.

Results: Viral pathogen was detected in 350 (94.29%) of children with SARI. Overall, the most popular viruses were: enterovirus/rhinovirus (EV/RV) (54.05%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (51.08%), human bocavirus (BoCA) (33.78%), human parainfluenzaviruse type 3 (PIV3) (15.41%), and adenovirus (ADV) (12.97%). Pandemic H1N1 was the dominant influenza virus (IFV) but was only detected in 20 (5.41%) of children. Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05). Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Piconaviruses (EV/RV) and paramyxoviruses are the most popular viral pathogens among children with SARI in this study. RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months. Higher incidence of VSARI and more susceptibilities to RSV and hMPV infections were found in suburban patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of age distribution among four age groups based on percentage of patients’ number.A) Comparison between urban and suburb/rural patients. B) Comparison between VSARI and SARI patients.
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pone-0072606-g002: Comparison of age distribution among four age groups based on percentage of patients’ number.A) Comparison between urban and suburb/rural patients. B) Comparison between VSARI and SARI patients.

Mentions: Patients from urban area are obviously older than suburb/rural ones, average age 15.34 vs. 8.72 months (Table 2). Further analysis of age distribution based on chi-test showed that ratio of young children (24 to 59 months) is obviously higher in rural area (21.6% vs. 3.9%, P < 0.001, Figure 2A).


Viral etiology and clinical profiles of children with severe acute respiratory infections in China.

Zhang C, Zhu N, Xie Z, Lu R, He B, Liu C, Ma X, Tan W - PLoS ONE (2013)

Comparison of age distribution among four age groups based on percentage of patients’ number.A) Comparison between urban and suburb/rural patients. B) Comparison between VSARI and SARI patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750056&req=5

pone-0072606-g002: Comparison of age distribution among four age groups based on percentage of patients’ number.A) Comparison between urban and suburb/rural patients. B) Comparison between VSARI and SARI patients.
Mentions: Patients from urban area are obviously older than suburb/rural ones, average age 15.34 vs. 8.72 months (Table 2). Further analysis of age distribution based on chi-test showed that ratio of young children (24 to 59 months) is obviously higher in rural area (21.6% vs. 3.9%, P < 0.001, Figure 2A).

Bottom Line: Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05).Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05).RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Medical Virology, Ministry of Health, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: No comprehensive analysis is available on the viral etiology and clinical characterization among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in China during 2009 H1N1 pandemic and post-pandemic period.

Methods: Cohort of 370 hospitalized children (1 to 72 months) with SARI from May 2008 to March 2010 was enrolled in this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens were tested by a commercial assay for 18 respiratory viral targets. The viral distribution and its association with clinical character were statistically analyzed.

Results: Viral pathogen was detected in 350 (94.29%) of children with SARI. Overall, the most popular viruses were: enterovirus/rhinovirus (EV/RV) (54.05%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (51.08%), human bocavirus (BoCA) (33.78%), human parainfluenzaviruse type 3 (PIV3) (15.41%), and adenovirus (ADV) (12.97%). Pandemic H1N1 was the dominant influenza virus (IFV) but was only detected in 20 (5.41%) of children. Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05). Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Piconaviruses (EV/RV) and paramyxoviruses are the most popular viral pathogens among children with SARI in this study. RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months. Higher incidence of VSARI and more susceptibilities to RSV and hMPV infections were found in suburban patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus