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The mitochondrial genome of Paramphistomum cervi (Digenea), the first representative for the family Paramphistomidae.

Yan HB, Wang XY, Lou ZZ, Li L, Blair D, Yin H, Cai JZ, Dai XL, Lei MT, Zhu XQ, Cai XP, Jia WZ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The positions of some transfer RNA genes differ.Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, based on concatenated nucleotide sequences and amino-acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes, placed P. cervi within the Order Plagiorchiida, but relationships depicted within that order were not quite as expected from previous studies.The complete mtDNA sequence of P. cervi provides important genetic markers for diagnostics, ecological and evolutionary studies of digeneans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health of Agriculture Ministry, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, PR China.

ABSTRACT
We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of a fluke, Paramphistomum cervi (Digenea: Paramphistomidae). This genome (14,014 bp) is slightly larger than that of Clonorchis sinensis (13,875 bp), but smaller than those of other digenean species. The mt genome of P. cervi contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 non-coding regions (NCRs), a complement consistent with those of other digeneans. The arrangement of protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes in the P. cervi mitochondrial genome is identical to that of other digeneans except for a group of Schistosoma species that exhibit a derived arrangement. The positions of some transfer RNA genes differ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, based on concatenated nucleotide sequences and amino-acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes, placed P. cervi within the Order Plagiorchiida, but relationships depicted within that order were not quite as expected from previous studies. The complete mtDNA sequence of P. cervi provides important genetic markers for diagnostics, ecological and evolutionary studies of digeneans.

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Two possible structures of tRNA-Cys (cloverleaf structure or D-loop).
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pone-0071300-g001: Two possible structures of tRNA-Cys (cloverleaf structure or D-loop).

Mentions: Except for tRNA-Ser1(AGN) and tRNA-Cys, all tRNA genes appear to exhibit the standard cloverleaf structure. The predicted secondary structure of the serine tRNA(AGN) contains the TΨC arm but lacks the DHU arm (terminology follows Wolstenholme, 1992) [43], a situation which is also found in O. felineus[30] and some other digeneans. For the cysteine tRNA, a four-armed structure is feasible, but so is a three-armed structure with a DHU-replacement loop (Fig. 1). It is noteworthy that tRNA-Glu and tRNA-Gly have switched positions in P. cervi relative to the situation in F. hepatica, P. westermani and the opisthorchiids (O. felineus, O. viverrini and C. sinensis), suggesting that this change in tRNA gene position could provide an important phylogenetic signal [19].


The mitochondrial genome of Paramphistomum cervi (Digenea), the first representative for the family Paramphistomidae.

Yan HB, Wang XY, Lou ZZ, Li L, Blair D, Yin H, Cai JZ, Dai XL, Lei MT, Zhu XQ, Cai XP, Jia WZ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Two possible structures of tRNA-Cys (cloverleaf structure or D-loop).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750040&req=5

pone-0071300-g001: Two possible structures of tRNA-Cys (cloverleaf structure or D-loop).
Mentions: Except for tRNA-Ser1(AGN) and tRNA-Cys, all tRNA genes appear to exhibit the standard cloverleaf structure. The predicted secondary structure of the serine tRNA(AGN) contains the TΨC arm but lacks the DHU arm (terminology follows Wolstenholme, 1992) [43], a situation which is also found in O. felineus[30] and some other digeneans. For the cysteine tRNA, a four-armed structure is feasible, but so is a three-armed structure with a DHU-replacement loop (Fig. 1). It is noteworthy that tRNA-Glu and tRNA-Gly have switched positions in P. cervi relative to the situation in F. hepatica, P. westermani and the opisthorchiids (O. felineus, O. viverrini and C. sinensis), suggesting that this change in tRNA gene position could provide an important phylogenetic signal [19].

Bottom Line: The positions of some transfer RNA genes differ.Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, based on concatenated nucleotide sequences and amino-acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes, placed P. cervi within the Order Plagiorchiida, but relationships depicted within that order were not quite as expected from previous studies.The complete mtDNA sequence of P. cervi provides important genetic markers for diagnostics, ecological and evolutionary studies of digeneans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health of Agriculture Ministry, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, PR China.

ABSTRACT
We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of a fluke, Paramphistomum cervi (Digenea: Paramphistomidae). This genome (14,014 bp) is slightly larger than that of Clonorchis sinensis (13,875 bp), but smaller than those of other digenean species. The mt genome of P. cervi contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 non-coding regions (NCRs), a complement consistent with those of other digeneans. The arrangement of protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes in the P. cervi mitochondrial genome is identical to that of other digeneans except for a group of Schistosoma species that exhibit a derived arrangement. The positions of some transfer RNA genes differ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, based on concatenated nucleotide sequences and amino-acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes, placed P. cervi within the Order Plagiorchiida, but relationships depicted within that order were not quite as expected from previous studies. The complete mtDNA sequence of P. cervi provides important genetic markers for diagnostics, ecological and evolutionary studies of digeneans.

Show MeSH