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Research tools to investigate movements, migrations, and life history of sturgeons (Acipenseridae), with an emphasis on marine-oriented populations.

Nelson TC, Doukakis P, Lindley ST, Schreier AD, Hightower JE, Hildebrand LR, Whitlock RE, Webb MA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Examples are provided regarding what the applications have revealed regarding movement and migration and how this information can be used for conservation and management.A more complete picture of migration is available for North American sturgeon species, while European and Asian species, which are among the most endangered sturgeons, are less understood.We put forth recommendations that encourage the support of stewardship initiatives to build awareness and provide key information for population assessment and monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Worldwide, sturgeons (Acipenseridae) are among the most endangered fishes due to habitat degradation, overfishing, and inherent life history characteristics (long life span, late maturation, and infrequent spawning). As most sturgeons are anadromous, a considerable portion of their life history occurs in estuarine and marine environments where they may encounter unique threats (e.g., interception in non-target fisheries). Of the 16 marine-oriented species, 12 are designated as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, and these include species commercially harvested. We review important research tools and techniques (tagging, electronic tagging, genetics, microchemistry, observatory) and discuss the comparative utility of these techniques to investigate movements, migrations, and life-history characteristics of sturgeons. Examples are provided regarding what the applications have revealed regarding movement and migration and how this information can be used for conservation and management. Through studies that include Gulf (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) and Green Sturgeon (A. medirostris), we illustrate what is known about well-studied species and then explore lesser-studied species. A more complete picture of migration is available for North American sturgeon species, while European and Asian species, which are among the most endangered sturgeons, are less understood. We put forth recommendations that encourage the support of stewardship initiatives to build awareness and provide key information for population assessment and monitoring.

Show MeSH
Documented distribution of Green Sturgeon in North America, determined from acoustic telemetry project with fixed receiver array.The orange asterisks mark the northernmost and southernmost locations of confirmed detections of acoustic-tagged Green Sturgeon. Green Sturgeon spawn in California in the Sacramento and Klamath rivers, and in Oregon in the Rogue River (shown in blue). They spend summers in estuaries and bays in California, Oregon, and Washington, and utilize the coastal ocean between southern Alaska and Baja California, Mexico, generally remaining in water less than 100 m deep. Summer aggregation areas are shown as yellow triangles. The 100 m isobath is shown as the light blue areas near the coast.
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pone-0071552-g003: Documented distribution of Green Sturgeon in North America, determined from acoustic telemetry project with fixed receiver array.The orange asterisks mark the northernmost and southernmost locations of confirmed detections of acoustic-tagged Green Sturgeon. Green Sturgeon spawn in California in the Sacramento and Klamath rivers, and in Oregon in the Rogue River (shown in blue). They spend summers in estuaries and bays in California, Oregon, and Washington, and utilize the coastal ocean between southern Alaska and Baja California, Mexico, generally remaining in water less than 100 m deep. Summer aggregation areas are shown as yellow triangles. The 100 m isobath is shown as the light blue areas near the coast.

Mentions: In contrast to the relatively well-studied Gulf Sturgeon, the North American Green Sturgeon was little studied until 2002, when the US National Marine Fisheries Service received a petition to list it under the US Endangered Species Act. A severe lack of demographic and basic life-history information hampered the subsequent status review [31]. A particularly troubling unknown was the population origin(s) of Green Sturgeon that form dense aggregations in certain estuaries during summer months. Green Sturgeon were known to use just three rivers for spawning (the Sacramento and Klamath rivers in California, and the Rogue River in Oregon), and to spend much of their lives in marine waters between Alaska and Baja California (Figure 3). The purpose of the summertime estuarine aggregations was unknown, as was the proportion of Green Sturgeon exhibiting this aggregation behaviour. Green Sturgeon in these aggregations are vulnerable to capture in gillnet fisheries that target White Sturgeon and Pacific salmon species, and face environmental threats from activities associated with shellfish aquaculture and industrial activities in the estuaries where they aggregate.


Research tools to investigate movements, migrations, and life history of sturgeons (Acipenseridae), with an emphasis on marine-oriented populations.

Nelson TC, Doukakis P, Lindley ST, Schreier AD, Hightower JE, Hildebrand LR, Whitlock RE, Webb MA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Documented distribution of Green Sturgeon in North America, determined from acoustic telemetry project with fixed receiver array.The orange asterisks mark the northernmost and southernmost locations of confirmed detections of acoustic-tagged Green Sturgeon. Green Sturgeon spawn in California in the Sacramento and Klamath rivers, and in Oregon in the Rogue River (shown in blue). They spend summers in estuaries and bays in California, Oregon, and Washington, and utilize the coastal ocean between southern Alaska and Baja California, Mexico, generally remaining in water less than 100 m deep. Summer aggregation areas are shown as yellow triangles. The 100 m isobath is shown as the light blue areas near the coast.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750015&req=5

pone-0071552-g003: Documented distribution of Green Sturgeon in North America, determined from acoustic telemetry project with fixed receiver array.The orange asterisks mark the northernmost and southernmost locations of confirmed detections of acoustic-tagged Green Sturgeon. Green Sturgeon spawn in California in the Sacramento and Klamath rivers, and in Oregon in the Rogue River (shown in blue). They spend summers in estuaries and bays in California, Oregon, and Washington, and utilize the coastal ocean between southern Alaska and Baja California, Mexico, generally remaining in water less than 100 m deep. Summer aggregation areas are shown as yellow triangles. The 100 m isobath is shown as the light blue areas near the coast.
Mentions: In contrast to the relatively well-studied Gulf Sturgeon, the North American Green Sturgeon was little studied until 2002, when the US National Marine Fisheries Service received a petition to list it under the US Endangered Species Act. A severe lack of demographic and basic life-history information hampered the subsequent status review [31]. A particularly troubling unknown was the population origin(s) of Green Sturgeon that form dense aggregations in certain estuaries during summer months. Green Sturgeon were known to use just three rivers for spawning (the Sacramento and Klamath rivers in California, and the Rogue River in Oregon), and to spend much of their lives in marine waters between Alaska and Baja California (Figure 3). The purpose of the summertime estuarine aggregations was unknown, as was the proportion of Green Sturgeon exhibiting this aggregation behaviour. Green Sturgeon in these aggregations are vulnerable to capture in gillnet fisheries that target White Sturgeon and Pacific salmon species, and face environmental threats from activities associated with shellfish aquaculture and industrial activities in the estuaries where they aggregate.

Bottom Line: Examples are provided regarding what the applications have revealed regarding movement and migration and how this information can be used for conservation and management.A more complete picture of migration is available for North American sturgeon species, while European and Asian species, which are among the most endangered sturgeons, are less understood.We put forth recommendations that encourage the support of stewardship initiatives to build awareness and provide key information for population assessment and monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Worldwide, sturgeons (Acipenseridae) are among the most endangered fishes due to habitat degradation, overfishing, and inherent life history characteristics (long life span, late maturation, and infrequent spawning). As most sturgeons are anadromous, a considerable portion of their life history occurs in estuarine and marine environments where they may encounter unique threats (e.g., interception in non-target fisheries). Of the 16 marine-oriented species, 12 are designated as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, and these include species commercially harvested. We review important research tools and techniques (tagging, electronic tagging, genetics, microchemistry, observatory) and discuss the comparative utility of these techniques to investigate movements, migrations, and life-history characteristics of sturgeons. Examples are provided regarding what the applications have revealed regarding movement and migration and how this information can be used for conservation and management. Through studies that include Gulf (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) and Green Sturgeon (A. medirostris), we illustrate what is known about well-studied species and then explore lesser-studied species. A more complete picture of migration is available for North American sturgeon species, while European and Asian species, which are among the most endangered sturgeons, are less understood. We put forth recommendations that encourage the support of stewardship initiatives to build awareness and provide key information for population assessment and monitoring.

Show MeSH