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Host races of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, in asexual populations from wild plants of taro and brinjal.

Agarwala BK, Choudhury PR - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Bottom Line: In contrast, brinjal clones, when transferred to taro, could not survive even in the first generation.Significant differences between the clones from two host species were also recorded in development time, generation time, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, and mean relative growth rate.The results showed that A. gossypii exists as distinct host races with different abilities of colonizing host plants, and its populations appear to have more potential of sympatic evolution than previously regarded.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecology and Biodiversity Laboratories, Department of Zoology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura, India. bagarwala00@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Worldwide, several studies have shown that adaptation to different host plants in phytophagous insects can promote speciation. The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae: Aphidini), is a highly polyphagous species, but its populations increase by parthenogenetic reproduction alone in Indian subcontinent. This study showed that genotypes living in wild plants of taro, Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta (L.) Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), and brinjal, Solanum torvum Swartz (Solanales: Solanaceae), behave as distinct host races. Success rates of colonization after reciprocal host transfers were very poor. Clones of A. gossypii from wild taro partly survived in the first generation when transferred to wild brinjal, but nymph mortality was 100% in the second generation. In contrast, brinjal clones, when transferred to taro, could not survive even in the first generation. Significant differences between the clones from two host species were also recorded in development time, generation time, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, and mean relative growth rate. Morphologically, aphids of wild taro clones possessed longer proboscis and fore-femora than the aphids of the brinjal clones. The results showed that A. gossypii exists as distinct host races with different abilities of colonizing host plants, and its populations appear to have more potential of sympatic evolution than previously regarded.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Success of colonization of Aphis gossypii through generations on their field hosts (control) and across host plants. A: treatment 1: A. gossypii of brinjal transferred to laboratory host taro. B: treatment II: A. gossypii of taro transferred to laboratory host brinjal. High quality figures are available online.
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f04_01: Success of colonization of Aphis gossypii through generations on their field hosts (control) and across host plants. A: treatment 1: A. gossypii of brinjal transferred to laboratory host taro. B: treatment II: A. gossypii of taro transferred to laboratory host brinjal. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: Aphids of A. gossypii clones from wild species of brinjal plants all died when transferred to wild taro plants (Figure 4A). Likewise, aphid clones from wild taro hosts could not survive when transferred to wild brinjal plants (Figure 4B).


Host races of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, in asexual populations from wild plants of taro and brinjal.

Agarwala BK, Choudhury PR - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Success of colonization of Aphis gossypii through generations on their field hosts (control) and across host plants. A: treatment 1: A. gossypii of brinjal transferred to laboratory host taro. B: treatment II: A. gossypii of taro transferred to laboratory host brinjal. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3735113&req=5

f04_01: Success of colonization of Aphis gossypii through generations on their field hosts (control) and across host plants. A: treatment 1: A. gossypii of brinjal transferred to laboratory host taro. B: treatment II: A. gossypii of taro transferred to laboratory host brinjal. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: Aphids of A. gossypii clones from wild species of brinjal plants all died when transferred to wild taro plants (Figure 4A). Likewise, aphid clones from wild taro hosts could not survive when transferred to wild brinjal plants (Figure 4B).

Bottom Line: In contrast, brinjal clones, when transferred to taro, could not survive even in the first generation.Significant differences between the clones from two host species were also recorded in development time, generation time, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, and mean relative growth rate.The results showed that A. gossypii exists as distinct host races with different abilities of colonizing host plants, and its populations appear to have more potential of sympatic evolution than previously regarded.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecology and Biodiversity Laboratories, Department of Zoology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura, India. bagarwala00@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Worldwide, several studies have shown that adaptation to different host plants in phytophagous insects can promote speciation. The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae: Aphidini), is a highly polyphagous species, but its populations increase by parthenogenetic reproduction alone in Indian subcontinent. This study showed that genotypes living in wild plants of taro, Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta (L.) Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), and brinjal, Solanum torvum Swartz (Solanales: Solanaceae), behave as distinct host races. Success rates of colonization after reciprocal host transfers were very poor. Clones of A. gossypii from wild taro partly survived in the first generation when transferred to wild brinjal, but nymph mortality was 100% in the second generation. In contrast, brinjal clones, when transferred to taro, could not survive even in the first generation. Significant differences between the clones from two host species were also recorded in development time, generation time, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, and mean relative growth rate. Morphologically, aphids of wild taro clones possessed longer proboscis and fore-femora than the aphids of the brinjal clones. The results showed that A. gossypii exists as distinct host races with different abilities of colonizing host plants, and its populations appear to have more potential of sympatic evolution than previously regarded.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus