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The community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope.

Frederickx C, Dekeirsschieter J, Verheggen FJ, Haubruge E - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Bottom Line: Six families and six species of parasitoids were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday (Braconidae), Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae), Trichopria sp. (Diapriidae), and Figites sp. (Figitidae).In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus.These five species colonize a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses, namely those from the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Functional and Evolutionary Entomology, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Gembloux, Belgium. frederickxchr@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined window of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonizing Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species of parasitoids were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday (Braconidae), Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae), Trichopria sp. (Diapriidae), and Figites sp. (Figitidae). In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonize a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses, namely those from the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae.

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Position of yellow traps around each pig carcass. High quality figures are available online.
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f01_01: Position of yellow traps around each pig carcass. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: In order to quantify insect colonization on pig carcasses, four yellow traps (plastic containers of 9 cm height and 27 cm diameter) filled with soapy water were placed around each carcass. The distribution of the yellow traps on the ground was as follows: one near the head, one near the dorsal face, one near the anus, and one near the ventral face (Figure 1). The insect traps were removed every week and the collected specimens were conserved in 80% norvanol D (ethanol denatured with ether). Only adult stages were included in the counting of collected insects during this study.


The community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope.

Frederickx C, Dekeirsschieter J, Verheggen FJ, Haubruge E - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Position of yellow traps around each pig carcass. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3735107&req=5

f01_01: Position of yellow traps around each pig carcass. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: In order to quantify insect colonization on pig carcasses, four yellow traps (plastic containers of 9 cm height and 27 cm diameter) filled with soapy water were placed around each carcass. The distribution of the yellow traps on the ground was as follows: one near the head, one near the dorsal face, one near the anus, and one near the ventral face (Figure 1). The insect traps were removed every week and the collected specimens were conserved in 80% norvanol D (ethanol denatured with ether). Only adult stages were included in the counting of collected insects during this study.

Bottom Line: Six families and six species of parasitoids were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday (Braconidae), Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae), Trichopria sp. (Diapriidae), and Figites sp. (Figitidae).In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus.These five species colonize a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses, namely those from the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Functional and Evolutionary Entomology, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Gembloux, Belgium. frederickxchr@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined window of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonizing Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species of parasitoids were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday (Braconidae), Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae), Trichopria sp. (Diapriidae), and Figites sp. (Figitidae). In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonize a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses, namely those from the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus