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The impact of coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous leaf-litter ants.

Dias Nda S, Zanetti R, Santos MS, Peñaflor MF, Broglio SM, Delabie JH - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Bottom Line: Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments.Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop.The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, Rua Dra. Sara Mesquita 2270, Bairro Pici, 60511-110 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. nivia@cnpat.embrapa.br

ABSTRACT
Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cluster analysis of habitats (fragment, border, and crop) from coffee and pasture cultivations using Euclidean distance for number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. High quality figures are available online.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f03_01: Cluster analysis of habitats (fragment, border, and crop) from coffee and pasture cultivations using Euclidean distance for number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: According to the cluster analysis (Figure 2, 3), three clusters were distinguished considering the number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. Forest fragments of coffee and pasture areas formed one group separated from the other habitats. The other two clusters comprised the border and crop of coffee and pasture plantations, indicating the influence of crops on the border skirting forest fragments (Figure 3). The coffee crop and the forest fragments close to pasture areas were the most distant habitats in terms of ant guild composition, while the pasture and its border with the forest were the most similar (Figure 2). Furthermore, the fact that the leaf-litter ant community was similar in the forest fragments irrespective of the crop points out the importance of the cultivation as a factor modulating predatory and omnivorous ant guild composition.


The impact of coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous leaf-litter ants.

Dias Nda S, Zanetti R, Santos MS, Peñaflor MF, Broglio SM, Delabie JH - J. Insect Sci. (2013)

Cluster analysis of habitats (fragment, border, and crop) from coffee and pasture cultivations using Euclidean distance for number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3735050&req=5

f03_01: Cluster analysis of habitats (fragment, border, and crop) from coffee and pasture cultivations using Euclidean distance for number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: According to the cluster analysis (Figure 2, 3), three clusters were distinguished considering the number and frequency of predatory and omnivorous ant species. Forest fragments of coffee and pasture areas formed one group separated from the other habitats. The other two clusters comprised the border and crop of coffee and pasture plantations, indicating the influence of crops on the border skirting forest fragments (Figure 3). The coffee crop and the forest fragments close to pasture areas were the most distant habitats in terms of ant guild composition, while the pasture and its border with the forest were the most similar (Figure 2). Furthermore, the fact that the leaf-litter ant community was similar in the forest fragments irrespective of the crop points out the importance of the cultivation as a factor modulating predatory and omnivorous ant guild composition.

Bottom Line: Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments.Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop.The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, Rua Dra. Sara Mesquita 2270, Bairro Pici, 60511-110 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. nivia@cnpat.embrapa.br

ABSTRACT
Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus