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Periradicular surgery of human permanent teeth with calcium-enriched mixture cement.

Asgary S, Ehsani S - Iran Endod J (2013)

Bottom Line: All patients were available for recall.Clinical and radiographic examination revealed complete healing of periradicular lesions, i.e. regeneration of periodontal ligament and lamina dura in 13 teeth (93% success) during a mean time of 18 months; moreover, the teeth were functional and asymptomatic.Favorable treatment outcomes in this prospective clinical study suggested that CEM cement may be a suitable root-end filling biomaterial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iranian Center for Endodontic Research, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Root-end preparation and restoration with an endodontic material are required when nonsurgical endodontic retreatment has failed or is impossible. The present clinical study reports the treatment outcomes of periradicular surgery using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement.

Materials and methods: A prospective outcome study of periradicular surgery using CEM was conducted on 14 permanent teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. Using a standardized surgical protocol, 2-3 mm of the root apex was resected; approximately 3 mm deep root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared and filled with CEM cement. All patients were available for recall.

Results: Clinical and radiographic examination revealed complete healing of periradicular lesions, i.e. regeneration of periodontal ligament and lamina dura in 13 teeth (93% success) during a mean time of 18 months; moreover, the teeth were functional and asymptomatic.

Conclusion: Favorable treatment outcomes in this prospective clinical study suggested that CEM cement may be a suitable root-end filling biomaterial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) A maxillary premolar with moderate apical lesion (case No. 10); B) immediate postoperative radiograph; C) the tooth 15 months after root-end surgery shows complete periradicular healing
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fig4931: A) A maxillary premolar with moderate apical lesion (case No. 10); B) immediate postoperative radiograph; C) the tooth 15 months after root-end surgery shows complete periradicular healing

Mentions: The mean time for recall was 18 months (12-26 months). There was no clinical sign of inflammation and/or infection except in one case (success equal to 93%). Cases 4 and 14 were maxillary left second and third molar, whose surgical approach was difficult; treatment outcomes were, however, satisfactory and the lesions successfully healed. The case illustrated in Figure 1 was the only re-operation case, which came to see us with a symptomatic periradicular lesion, persisting after periradicular surgery. Favorable outcomes were achieved according to the “Quality Guidelines” of ESE. Radiographic examination revealed normal periodontium in all healed teeth (Figures 1, 2 and 3).


Periradicular surgery of human permanent teeth with calcium-enriched mixture cement.

Asgary S, Ehsani S - Iran Endod J (2013)

A) A maxillary premolar with moderate apical lesion (case No. 10); B) immediate postoperative radiograph; C) the tooth 15 months after root-end surgery shows complete periradicular healing
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3734518&req=5

fig4931: A) A maxillary premolar with moderate apical lesion (case No. 10); B) immediate postoperative radiograph; C) the tooth 15 months after root-end surgery shows complete periradicular healing
Mentions: The mean time for recall was 18 months (12-26 months). There was no clinical sign of inflammation and/or infection except in one case (success equal to 93%). Cases 4 and 14 were maxillary left second and third molar, whose surgical approach was difficult; treatment outcomes were, however, satisfactory and the lesions successfully healed. The case illustrated in Figure 1 was the only re-operation case, which came to see us with a symptomatic periradicular lesion, persisting after periradicular surgery. Favorable outcomes were achieved according to the “Quality Guidelines” of ESE. Radiographic examination revealed normal periodontium in all healed teeth (Figures 1, 2 and 3).

Bottom Line: All patients were available for recall.Clinical and radiographic examination revealed complete healing of periradicular lesions, i.e. regeneration of periodontal ligament and lamina dura in 13 teeth (93% success) during a mean time of 18 months; moreover, the teeth were functional and asymptomatic.Favorable treatment outcomes in this prospective clinical study suggested that CEM cement may be a suitable root-end filling biomaterial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iranian Center for Endodontic Research, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Root-end preparation and restoration with an endodontic material are required when nonsurgical endodontic retreatment has failed or is impossible. The present clinical study reports the treatment outcomes of periradicular surgery using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement.

Materials and methods: A prospective outcome study of periradicular surgery using CEM was conducted on 14 permanent teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. Using a standardized surgical protocol, 2-3 mm of the root apex was resected; approximately 3 mm deep root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared and filled with CEM cement. All patients were available for recall.

Results: Clinical and radiographic examination revealed complete healing of periradicular lesions, i.e. regeneration of periodontal ligament and lamina dura in 13 teeth (93% success) during a mean time of 18 months; moreover, the teeth were functional and asymptomatic.

Conclusion: Favorable treatment outcomes in this prospective clinical study suggested that CEM cement may be a suitable root-end filling biomaterial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus