Limits...
Neuroimaging studies of pediatric social anxiety: paradigms, pitfalls and a new direction for investigating the neural mechanisms.

Jarcho JM, Leibenluft E, Walker OL, Fox NA, Pine DS, Nelson EE - Biol Mood Anxiety Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: We then present preliminary results from the Virtual School paradigm, a novel peer-based social interaction task.This paradigm is designed to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating individual differences in social response flexibility and in participants' responses to uncertainty in social contexts.We discuss the utility of this new paradigm for research on brain function and developmental psychopathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on Developmental and Affective Neuroscience, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 15 K, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT
Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is a common and debilitating condition that typically manifests in adolescence. Here we describe cognitive factors engaged by brain-imaging tasks, which model the peer-based social interactions that evoke symptoms of SAD. We then present preliminary results from the Virtual School paradigm, a novel peer-based social interaction task. This paradigm is designed to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating individual differences in social response flexibility and in participants' responses to uncertainty in social contexts. We discuss the utility of this new paradigm for research on brain function and developmental psychopathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Timeline of a trial.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733938&req=5

Figure 2: Timeline of a trial.

Mentions: Each run includes 24 trials separated by an inter-trial interval (0–8 sec; M = 4 sec). Each trial (see Figure 2) begins when the word “Typing…” appears above one of the Other Students (2–4 sec; M = 3 sec). This is followed by a written comment directed at the New Kid/Participant (2–10 sec; M = 6 sec). These comments are either positive (e.g., “Cool avatar!”) or negative (e.g., “You’re lame.”). To strengthen the perception that they are interacting with real peers, half of the comments reference information from the participant’s personal profile (e.g., “You like Justin Bieber? You’re lame.”). Nice and Mean peers provide 100% positive or negative social feedback. Unpredictable peers provide 50% positive and negative social feedback.


Neuroimaging studies of pediatric social anxiety: paradigms, pitfalls and a new direction for investigating the neural mechanisms.

Jarcho JM, Leibenluft E, Walker OL, Fox NA, Pine DS, Nelson EE - Biol Mood Anxiety Disord (2013)

Timeline of a trial.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733938&req=5

Figure 2: Timeline of a trial.
Mentions: Each run includes 24 trials separated by an inter-trial interval (0–8 sec; M = 4 sec). Each trial (see Figure 2) begins when the word “Typing…” appears above one of the Other Students (2–4 sec; M = 3 sec). This is followed by a written comment directed at the New Kid/Participant (2–10 sec; M = 6 sec). These comments are either positive (e.g., “Cool avatar!”) or negative (e.g., “You’re lame.”). To strengthen the perception that they are interacting with real peers, half of the comments reference information from the participant’s personal profile (e.g., “You like Justin Bieber? You’re lame.”). Nice and Mean peers provide 100% positive or negative social feedback. Unpredictable peers provide 50% positive and negative social feedback.

Bottom Line: We then present preliminary results from the Virtual School paradigm, a novel peer-based social interaction task.This paradigm is designed to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating individual differences in social response flexibility and in participants' responses to uncertainty in social contexts.We discuss the utility of this new paradigm for research on brain function and developmental psychopathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on Developmental and Affective Neuroscience, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 15 K, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT
Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is a common and debilitating condition that typically manifests in adolescence. Here we describe cognitive factors engaged by brain-imaging tasks, which model the peer-based social interactions that evoke symptoms of SAD. We then present preliminary results from the Virtual School paradigm, a novel peer-based social interaction task. This paradigm is designed to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating individual differences in social response flexibility and in participants' responses to uncertainty in social contexts. We discuss the utility of this new paradigm for research on brain function and developmental psychopathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus