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Effect of leaf type and pesticide exposure on abundance of bacterial taxa in mosquito larval habitats.

Muturi EJ, Orindi BO, Kim CH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: While the microbial biomass associated with different leaf species in container aquatic habitats is well documented, the taxonomic composition of these microbes and their response to common environmental stressors is poorly understood.We found support for both hypotheses suggesting that leaf litter identity and chemical contamination may alter the quality and quantity of mosquito food base (microbial communities) in larval habitats.The effect of pesticides on microbial communities varied significantly among leaf types, suggesting that the impact of pesticides on natural microbial communities may be highly complex and difficult to predict.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, United States of America. ephajumu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Lentic freshwater systems including those inhabited by aquatic stages of mosquitoes derive most of their carbon inputs from terrestrial organic matter mainly leaf litter. The leaf litter is colonized by microbial communities that provide the resource base for mosquito larvae. While the microbial biomass associated with different leaf species in container aquatic habitats is well documented, the taxonomic composition of these microbes and their response to common environmental stressors is poorly understood. We used indoor aquatic microcosms to determine the abundances of major taxonomic groups of bacteria in leaf litters from seven plant species and their responses to low concentrations of four pesticides with different modes of action on the target organisms; permethrin, malathion, atrazine and glyphosate. We tested the hypotheses that leaf species support different quantities of major taxonomic groups of bacteria and that exposure to pesticides at environmentally relevant concentrations alters bacterial abundance and community structure in mosquito larval habitats. We found support for both hypotheses suggesting that leaf litter identity and chemical contamination may alter the quality and quantity of mosquito food base (microbial communities) in larval habitats. The effect of pesticides on microbial communities varied significantly among leaf types, suggesting that the impact of pesticides on natural microbial communities may be highly complex and difficult to predict. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential for detritus composition within mosquito larval habitats and exposure to pesticides to influence the quality of mosquito larval habitats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Canonical discriminant analysis showing the ordination of bacterial taxa along the first two axes and their correlations with pesticide treatments in grass, hackberry, honeysuckle and sugar maple.These are rapid decaying leaf types.
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pone-0071812-g003: Canonical discriminant analysis showing the ordination of bacterial taxa along the first two axes and their correlations with pesticide treatments in grass, hackberry, honeysuckle and sugar maple.These are rapid decaying leaf types.

Mentions: MANOVA revealed a significant interaction between leaf type and In order to determine how pesticide treatments differed with respect to their effect on bacterial taxa within leaf types, we conducted separate discriminant function analysis for each leaf type. The first two discriminant functions were statistically significant for each leaf type. However, some bacteria taxa loaded significantly in both DFs and were interpreted for the function on which they loaded the highest (Table 3, Fig. 3 and 4). Ninety five percent of samples in honeysuckle and northern red oak were correctly assigned to pesticide treatments while all the samples (100%) in the remaining leaf types were correctly assigned to pesticide treatments.


Effect of leaf type and pesticide exposure on abundance of bacterial taxa in mosquito larval habitats.

Muturi EJ, Orindi BO, Kim CH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Canonical discriminant analysis showing the ordination of bacterial taxa along the first two axes and their correlations with pesticide treatments in grass, hackberry, honeysuckle and sugar maple.These are rapid decaying leaf types.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733839&req=5

pone-0071812-g003: Canonical discriminant analysis showing the ordination of bacterial taxa along the first two axes and their correlations with pesticide treatments in grass, hackberry, honeysuckle and sugar maple.These are rapid decaying leaf types.
Mentions: MANOVA revealed a significant interaction between leaf type and In order to determine how pesticide treatments differed with respect to their effect on bacterial taxa within leaf types, we conducted separate discriminant function analysis for each leaf type. The first two discriminant functions were statistically significant for each leaf type. However, some bacteria taxa loaded significantly in both DFs and were interpreted for the function on which they loaded the highest (Table 3, Fig. 3 and 4). Ninety five percent of samples in honeysuckle and northern red oak were correctly assigned to pesticide treatments while all the samples (100%) in the remaining leaf types were correctly assigned to pesticide treatments.

Bottom Line: While the microbial biomass associated with different leaf species in container aquatic habitats is well documented, the taxonomic composition of these microbes and their response to common environmental stressors is poorly understood.We found support for both hypotheses suggesting that leaf litter identity and chemical contamination may alter the quality and quantity of mosquito food base (microbial communities) in larval habitats.The effect of pesticides on microbial communities varied significantly among leaf types, suggesting that the impact of pesticides on natural microbial communities may be highly complex and difficult to predict.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, United States of America. ephajumu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Lentic freshwater systems including those inhabited by aquatic stages of mosquitoes derive most of their carbon inputs from terrestrial organic matter mainly leaf litter. The leaf litter is colonized by microbial communities that provide the resource base for mosquito larvae. While the microbial biomass associated with different leaf species in container aquatic habitats is well documented, the taxonomic composition of these microbes and their response to common environmental stressors is poorly understood. We used indoor aquatic microcosms to determine the abundances of major taxonomic groups of bacteria in leaf litters from seven plant species and their responses to low concentrations of four pesticides with different modes of action on the target organisms; permethrin, malathion, atrazine and glyphosate. We tested the hypotheses that leaf species support different quantities of major taxonomic groups of bacteria and that exposure to pesticides at environmentally relevant concentrations alters bacterial abundance and community structure in mosquito larval habitats. We found support for both hypotheses suggesting that leaf litter identity and chemical contamination may alter the quality and quantity of mosquito food base (microbial communities) in larval habitats. The effect of pesticides on microbial communities varied significantly among leaf types, suggesting that the impact of pesticides on natural microbial communities may be highly complex and difficult to predict. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential for detritus composition within mosquito larval habitats and exposure to pesticides to influence the quality of mosquito larval habitats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus