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Patterns of horse-rider coordination during endurance race: a dynamical system approach.

Viry S, Sleimen-Malkoun R, Temprado JJ, Frances JP, Berton E, Laurent M, Nicol C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements.The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination.The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Institut des Sciences du Mouvement, Marseille, France. s.viry@brdconcept.fr

ABSTRACT
In riding, most biomechanical studies have focused on the description of the horse locomotion in unridden condition. In this study, we draw the prospect of how the basic principles established in inter-personal coordination by the theory of Coordination Dynamics may provide a conceptual and methodological framework for understanding the horse-rider coupling. The recent development of mobile technologies allows combined horse and rider recordings during long lasting natural events such as endurance races. Six international horse-rider dyads were thus recorded during a 120 km race by using two tri-axial accelerometers placed on the horses and riders, respectively. The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements. The obtained shapes and angles of Lissajous plots together with values of relative phase between horse and rider displacements at lower reversal point allowed us to characterize four coordination patterns, reflecting the use of two riding techniques per horse's gait (trot and canter). The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination. The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

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Quantification of the stride occurrences for each of the two riding techniques per horse's gait.The stride distribution at the trot (left graph) and at the canter (right graph) is based on the rider's craniocaudal (CC) displacement, which is of lower amplitude in the two-point technique (A and C) as compared to its value in either sitting canter (D) or rising trot (B). The latter technique was mostly used by the present horse-rider system (dyad 1) in the two loops under interest.
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pone-0071804-g003: Quantification of the stride occurrences for each of the two riding techniques per horse's gait.The stride distribution at the trot (left graph) and at the canter (right graph) is based on the rider's craniocaudal (CC) displacement, which is of lower amplitude in the two-point technique (A and C) as compared to its value in either sitting canter (D) or rising trot (B). The latter technique was mostly used by the present horse-rider system (dyad 1) in the two loops under interest.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 3 for the strides performed at the trot during the two intermediate loops, the rider's CC displacement averaged 63.7±13.0 in the two-point trot technique (A) and 131.4±14.2 mm in the rising technique (B). During the strides performed at the canter, amplitude was 134.7±17.3 mm in two-point technique (C) and 194.6±11.2 mm in the sitting technique (D). As expected, amplitude observed during sitting canter was larger than in the other techniques. The similar range of values observed in the rising trot and in the two-point canter techniques confirms the necessity of a preliminary gait differentiation.


Patterns of horse-rider coordination during endurance race: a dynamical system approach.

Viry S, Sleimen-Malkoun R, Temprado JJ, Frances JP, Berton E, Laurent M, Nicol C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Quantification of the stride occurrences for each of the two riding techniques per horse's gait.The stride distribution at the trot (left graph) and at the canter (right graph) is based on the rider's craniocaudal (CC) displacement, which is of lower amplitude in the two-point technique (A and C) as compared to its value in either sitting canter (D) or rising trot (B). The latter technique was mostly used by the present horse-rider system (dyad 1) in the two loops under interest.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733789&req=5

pone-0071804-g003: Quantification of the stride occurrences for each of the two riding techniques per horse's gait.The stride distribution at the trot (left graph) and at the canter (right graph) is based on the rider's craniocaudal (CC) displacement, which is of lower amplitude in the two-point technique (A and C) as compared to its value in either sitting canter (D) or rising trot (B). The latter technique was mostly used by the present horse-rider system (dyad 1) in the two loops under interest.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 3 for the strides performed at the trot during the two intermediate loops, the rider's CC displacement averaged 63.7±13.0 in the two-point trot technique (A) and 131.4±14.2 mm in the rising technique (B). During the strides performed at the canter, amplitude was 134.7±17.3 mm in two-point technique (C) and 194.6±11.2 mm in the sitting technique (D). As expected, amplitude observed during sitting canter was larger than in the other techniques. The similar range of values observed in the rising trot and in the two-point canter techniques confirms the necessity of a preliminary gait differentiation.

Bottom Line: The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements.The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination.The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Institut des Sciences du Mouvement, Marseille, France. s.viry@brdconcept.fr

ABSTRACT
In riding, most biomechanical studies have focused on the description of the horse locomotion in unridden condition. In this study, we draw the prospect of how the basic principles established in inter-personal coordination by the theory of Coordination Dynamics may provide a conceptual and methodological framework for understanding the horse-rider coupling. The recent development of mobile technologies allows combined horse and rider recordings during long lasting natural events such as endurance races. Six international horse-rider dyads were thus recorded during a 120 km race by using two tri-axial accelerometers placed on the horses and riders, respectively. The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements. The obtained shapes and angles of Lissajous plots together with values of relative phase between horse and rider displacements at lower reversal point allowed us to characterize four coordination patterns, reflecting the use of two riding techniques per horse's gait (trot and canter). The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination. The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

Show MeSH