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A high diet quality is associated with lower incidence of cardiovascular events in the Malmö diet and cancer cohort.

Hlebowicz J, Drake I, Gullberg B, Sonestedt E, Wallström P, Persson M, Nilsson J, Hedblad B, Wirfält E - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders.In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73) in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91) in women.When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Emergency, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Aims: To investigate if diet quality is related to incidence of cardiovascular (CV) events.

Subjects and methods: A diet quality index based on the 2005 Swedish Nutrition Recommendations and the Swedish Dietary Guidelines was created and included six dietary components: saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. The index ranked 17126 participants (59% women) of the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (Sweden) on their dietary intakes. Total index score was categorized as low, medium or high. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders. The incidence of first CV events (non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke or death from ischemic heart disease) was monitored from baseline (1991-1996) until December 31, 2008; 703 CV events occurred in women and 1093 in men.

Results: A high diet quality was associated with decreased risk of CV events when compared to a low diet quality. In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73) in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91) in women. When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen.

Conclusion: High quality diets in line with current recommendations may reduce the risk of CV events. This study illustrates the importance of considering a combination of dietary factors when evaluating diet-disease associations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier curves of cardiovascular event-free survival by categories of DQI-SNR score among women (n = 10 186) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (1991–2008).Analysis time was cut-off at 16 years of follow-up.
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pone-0071095-g002: Kaplan-Meier curves of cardiovascular event-free survival by categories of DQI-SNR score among women (n = 10 186) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (1991–2008).Analysis time was cut-off at 16 years of follow-up.

Mentions: Survival curves for the three categories of DQI-SNR score are shown in Figure 1 for men and Figure 2 for women. Significant trends of decreased risk were seen across the DQI-SNR score categories for both men and women (Table 2). Inclusion of waist circumference, smoking, leisure time physical activity, and alcohol consumption in the analysis did not substantially change the associations (Table 2). When examining the full cohort (i.e., without exclusions), both men and women with high scores had decreased risk of CV events, compared to those with low scores (data not shown), but these risk estimates were weaker (especially in women), compared to the main analysis.


A high diet quality is associated with lower incidence of cardiovascular events in the Malmö diet and cancer cohort.

Hlebowicz J, Drake I, Gullberg B, Sonestedt E, Wallström P, Persson M, Nilsson J, Hedblad B, Wirfält E - PLoS ONE (2013)

Kaplan-Meier curves of cardiovascular event-free survival by categories of DQI-SNR score among women (n = 10 186) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (1991–2008).Analysis time was cut-off at 16 years of follow-up.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733649&req=5

pone-0071095-g002: Kaplan-Meier curves of cardiovascular event-free survival by categories of DQI-SNR score among women (n = 10 186) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (1991–2008).Analysis time was cut-off at 16 years of follow-up.
Mentions: Survival curves for the three categories of DQI-SNR score are shown in Figure 1 for men and Figure 2 for women. Significant trends of decreased risk were seen across the DQI-SNR score categories for both men and women (Table 2). Inclusion of waist circumference, smoking, leisure time physical activity, and alcohol consumption in the analysis did not substantially change the associations (Table 2). When examining the full cohort (i.e., without exclusions), both men and women with high scores had decreased risk of CV events, compared to those with low scores (data not shown), but these risk estimates were weaker (especially in women), compared to the main analysis.

Bottom Line: Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders.In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73) in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91) in women.When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Emergency, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Aims: To investigate if diet quality is related to incidence of cardiovascular (CV) events.

Subjects and methods: A diet quality index based on the 2005 Swedish Nutrition Recommendations and the Swedish Dietary Guidelines was created and included six dietary components: saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. The index ranked 17126 participants (59% women) of the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (Sweden) on their dietary intakes. Total index score was categorized as low, medium or high. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders. The incidence of first CV events (non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke or death from ischemic heart disease) was monitored from baseline (1991-1996) until December 31, 2008; 703 CV events occurred in women and 1093 in men.

Results: A high diet quality was associated with decreased risk of CV events when compared to a low diet quality. In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73) in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91) in women. When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen.

Conclusion: High quality diets in line with current recommendations may reduce the risk of CV events. This study illustrates the importance of considering a combination of dietary factors when evaluating diet-disease associations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus