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Sagittal abdominal diameter shows better correlation with cardiovascular risk factors than waist circumference and BMI.

de Souza NC, de Oliveira EP - J Diabetes Metab Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.24) (p < 0.05).BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05).SAD correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Paulista University (UNIP), Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity (abdominal adiposity) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and the most used methods to measure the adiposity are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD).

Objective: To correlate BMI, WC, and SAD with biochemical parameters and blood pressure in adults.

Methods: A non-experimental exploratory/descriptive and cross sectional study was developed and it was assessed 133 subjects (59 men and 74 women) aging between 18 and 87 years. It was registered the patients' weight (kg), height (m), BMI (kg/m(2)), WC (cm) and SAD (cm), and these parameters were correlated with glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and blood pressure.

Results: After adjustment for gender and age, it was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.21) (p < 0.05). It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.24) (p < 0.05). BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: SAD correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biochemical variables and arterial blood pressure correlations with SAD, WC, and BMI (adjusted for gender and age). *p < 0.05 / SAP: Systolic arterial blood pressure / DAP: Diastolic Arterial blood pressure / HDL-c: High density lipoprotein / TG: Triglycerides / LDL-c: Low density lipoprotein / TC: Total cholesterol / SAD: Sagittal abdominal diameter / WC: Waist circumference / BMI: Body mass index.
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Figure 1: Biochemical variables and arterial blood pressure correlations with SAD, WC, and BMI (adjusted for gender and age). *p < 0.05 / SAP: Systolic arterial blood pressure / DAP: Diastolic Arterial blood pressure / HDL-c: High density lipoprotein / TG: Triglycerides / LDL-c: Low density lipoprotein / TC: Total cholesterol / SAD: Sagittal abdominal diameter / WC: Waist circumference / BMI: Body mass index.

Mentions: It was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.21) (p < 0.05). It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.24) (p < 0.05). BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20) and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05) (Figure 1).


Sagittal abdominal diameter shows better correlation with cardiovascular risk factors than waist circumference and BMI.

de Souza NC, de Oliveira EP - J Diabetes Metab Disord (2013)

Biochemical variables and arterial blood pressure correlations with SAD, WC, and BMI (adjusted for gender and age). *p < 0.05 / SAP: Systolic arterial blood pressure / DAP: Diastolic Arterial blood pressure / HDL-c: High density lipoprotein / TG: Triglycerides / LDL-c: Low density lipoprotein / TC: Total cholesterol / SAD: Sagittal abdominal diameter / WC: Waist circumference / BMI: Body mass index.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3733622&req=5

Figure 1: Biochemical variables and arterial blood pressure correlations with SAD, WC, and BMI (adjusted for gender and age). *p < 0.05 / SAP: Systolic arterial blood pressure / DAP: Diastolic Arterial blood pressure / HDL-c: High density lipoprotein / TG: Triglycerides / LDL-c: Low density lipoprotein / TC: Total cholesterol / SAD: Sagittal abdominal diameter / WC: Waist circumference / BMI: Body mass index.
Mentions: It was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.21) (p < 0.05). It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.24) (p < 0.05). BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20) and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.24) (p < 0.05).BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05).SAD correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Paulista University (UNIP), Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity (abdominal adiposity) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and the most used methods to measure the adiposity are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD).

Objective: To correlate BMI, WC, and SAD with biochemical parameters and blood pressure in adults.

Methods: A non-experimental exploratory/descriptive and cross sectional study was developed and it was assessed 133 subjects (59 men and 74 women) aging between 18 and 87 years. It was registered the patients' weight (kg), height (m), BMI (kg/m(2)), WC (cm) and SAD (cm), and these parameters were correlated with glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and blood pressure.

Results: After adjustment for gender and age, it was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.21) (p < 0.05). It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.24) (p < 0.05). BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: SAD correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus