Limits...
Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

Buffet JP, Pisanu B, Brisse S, Roussel S, Félix B, Halos L, Chapuis JL, Vayssier-Taussat M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts.Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents.Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USC INRA Bipar, Bartonella et Tiques, Maisons-Alfort, France.

ABSTRACT
Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogeny of virB5 gene sequences using Maximum likelihood, with a GTR substitution model.Clusters in which virB5 alleles were found are indicated by colors and shapes identical to Figure 1 (see legend). Bootstrap values higher than 80% are given at the nodes. Arrows indicate virB5 sequences amplified and sequenced from strains obtained from wood mice.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722228&req=5

pone-0068956-g005: Phylogeny of virB5 gene sequences using Maximum likelihood, with a GTR substitution model.Clusters in which virB5 alleles were found are indicated by colors and shapes identical to Figure 1 (see legend). Bootstrap values higher than 80% are given at the nodes. Arrows indicate virB5 sequences amplified and sequenced from strains obtained from wood mice.

Mentions: A phylogenetic tree (Figure 5) was generated using maximum likelihood with a GTR substitution model. virB5 sequences were clustered into seven clades (from clusters 1 to 7, in Figure 5). In contrast to housekeeping genes, phylogenetic analysis of virB5 sequences merged those sequences related to B. taylorii cluster C (specific to bank voles) with that of B. taylorii cluster D (infecting mainly bank voles and to a lesser extent, field mice), with 1.1% nucleotide divergence (see cluster 3 in Figure 5). This phylogenetic analysis also uncovered a conspicuous pattern of homologous recombination of short intragenic regions and entire virB5 sequences among the clusters, resulting in mosaic-like structures. The virB5 sequence of genotype A550 (B. taylorii, cluster D with MLSA, recovered from bank voles) was identical to cluster A sequences (infecting mainly bank voles, and wood mice to a lesser extent). Likewise, the virB5 sequence of genotype A554 (cluster E with MLSA, infecting wood mice) was merged with those from cluster A. Moreover, the virB5 sequences of genotype A612 and A357 (cluster B infecting bank voles) were nearly identical to those of B. grahamii (exclusively infecting bank voles).


Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

Buffet JP, Pisanu B, Brisse S, Roussel S, Félix B, Halos L, Chapuis JL, Vayssier-Taussat M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Phylogeny of virB5 gene sequences using Maximum likelihood, with a GTR substitution model.Clusters in which virB5 alleles were found are indicated by colors and shapes identical to Figure 1 (see legend). Bootstrap values higher than 80% are given at the nodes. Arrows indicate virB5 sequences amplified and sequenced from strains obtained from wood mice.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722228&req=5

pone-0068956-g005: Phylogeny of virB5 gene sequences using Maximum likelihood, with a GTR substitution model.Clusters in which virB5 alleles were found are indicated by colors and shapes identical to Figure 1 (see legend). Bootstrap values higher than 80% are given at the nodes. Arrows indicate virB5 sequences amplified and sequenced from strains obtained from wood mice.
Mentions: A phylogenetic tree (Figure 5) was generated using maximum likelihood with a GTR substitution model. virB5 sequences were clustered into seven clades (from clusters 1 to 7, in Figure 5). In contrast to housekeeping genes, phylogenetic analysis of virB5 sequences merged those sequences related to B. taylorii cluster C (specific to bank voles) with that of B. taylorii cluster D (infecting mainly bank voles and to a lesser extent, field mice), with 1.1% nucleotide divergence (see cluster 3 in Figure 5). This phylogenetic analysis also uncovered a conspicuous pattern of homologous recombination of short intragenic regions and entire virB5 sequences among the clusters, resulting in mosaic-like structures. The virB5 sequence of genotype A550 (B. taylorii, cluster D with MLSA, recovered from bank voles) was identical to cluster A sequences (infecting mainly bank voles, and wood mice to a lesser extent). Likewise, the virB5 sequence of genotype A554 (cluster E with MLSA, infecting wood mice) was merged with those from cluster A. Moreover, the virB5 sequences of genotype A612 and A357 (cluster B infecting bank voles) were nearly identical to those of B. grahamii (exclusively infecting bank voles).

Bottom Line: Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts.Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents.Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USC INRA Bipar, Bartonella et Tiques, Maisons-Alfort, France.

ABSTRACT
Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus