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Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

Buffet JP, Pisanu B, Brisse S, Roussel S, Félix B, Halos L, Chapuis JL, Vayssier-Taussat M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts.Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents.Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USC INRA Bipar, Bartonella et Tiques, Maisons-Alfort, France.

ABSTRACT
Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

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Phylogenetic analysis of representative genotypes circulating in the rodent community.Maximum-likelihood analysis of 63 Bartonella unique genotypes detected in this study and 19 Bartonella species using the alignment of concatenated sequences of six loci (ftsZ, gltA, groEL, nuoG, ribC and rpoB). The numbers at the nodes correspond to bootstrap values higher than 80%.
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pone-0068956-g001: Phylogenetic analysis of representative genotypes circulating in the rodent community.Maximum-likelihood analysis of 63 Bartonella unique genotypes detected in this study and 19 Bartonella species using the alignment of concatenated sequences of six loci (ftsZ, gltA, groEL, nuoG, ribC and rpoB). The numbers at the nodes correspond to bootstrap values higher than 80%.

Mentions: To characterize the diversity of Bartonella circulating in the rodent community, we first performed a phylogenetic analysis based on the alignment of the concatenated sequences of the six housekeeping genes, using the 195 Bartonella gltA-positive DNA extracts and the corresponding Bartonella strains when available. The phylogenetic tree (Figure 1) was generated using maximum likelihood (PhyML) with a K81 substitution model (estimated using jModelTest). Only one representative of each genotype was reported on the phylogenetic tree. This analysis revealed the phylogenetic relationships of the 63 unique genotypes with three known Bartonella species: B. taylorii, B. doshiae, and B. grahamii; and a genotype (A296, cluster H) closely related to B. rochalimae and B. clarridgeiae (8.2 and 9.3% nucleotide divergence respectively). B. grahamii (cluster G) did not exhibit an obvious internal phylogenetic structure, except for one genotype (A621) recovered from a single bank vole, which was genetically diverged from all the other B. grahamii genotypes by 2.4 to 2.9%. In contrast, within the B. taylorii species, the phylogenetic tree showed a clear demarcation of five clades (A, B, C, D and E) with high bootstrap support (81–100%). Each clade formed distinct compact clusters separated by genetic distances ranging from 1.3 to 3.5%. As a MLSA-based genetic distance below 5% is sufficient to join a genotype to a known species, all these clusters clearly belong to B. taylorii species [45]. Two genotypes were associated with the species B. doshiae (cluster F), of which one (A340) was more closely related to the R18 reference strain with a genetic distance of 0.7%, and another (A538) more distant which diverged by a distance of 4.5%. Distribution of Bartonella species and clusters in the rodent community is summarized in Table 1. The 63 different genotypes, the rodent species from where they were detected or isolated (as well the number of animal in which they were recoververd) and the corresponding Bartonella species and clusters are descripted in Table 2.


Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

Buffet JP, Pisanu B, Brisse S, Roussel S, Félix B, Halos L, Chapuis JL, Vayssier-Taussat M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Phylogenetic analysis of representative genotypes circulating in the rodent community.Maximum-likelihood analysis of 63 Bartonella unique genotypes detected in this study and 19 Bartonella species using the alignment of concatenated sequences of six loci (ftsZ, gltA, groEL, nuoG, ribC and rpoB). The numbers at the nodes correspond to bootstrap values higher than 80%.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722228&req=5

pone-0068956-g001: Phylogenetic analysis of representative genotypes circulating in the rodent community.Maximum-likelihood analysis of 63 Bartonella unique genotypes detected in this study and 19 Bartonella species using the alignment of concatenated sequences of six loci (ftsZ, gltA, groEL, nuoG, ribC and rpoB). The numbers at the nodes correspond to bootstrap values higher than 80%.
Mentions: To characterize the diversity of Bartonella circulating in the rodent community, we first performed a phylogenetic analysis based on the alignment of the concatenated sequences of the six housekeeping genes, using the 195 Bartonella gltA-positive DNA extracts and the corresponding Bartonella strains when available. The phylogenetic tree (Figure 1) was generated using maximum likelihood (PhyML) with a K81 substitution model (estimated using jModelTest). Only one representative of each genotype was reported on the phylogenetic tree. This analysis revealed the phylogenetic relationships of the 63 unique genotypes with three known Bartonella species: B. taylorii, B. doshiae, and B. grahamii; and a genotype (A296, cluster H) closely related to B. rochalimae and B. clarridgeiae (8.2 and 9.3% nucleotide divergence respectively). B. grahamii (cluster G) did not exhibit an obvious internal phylogenetic structure, except for one genotype (A621) recovered from a single bank vole, which was genetically diverged from all the other B. grahamii genotypes by 2.4 to 2.9%. In contrast, within the B. taylorii species, the phylogenetic tree showed a clear demarcation of five clades (A, B, C, D and E) with high bootstrap support (81–100%). Each clade formed distinct compact clusters separated by genetic distances ranging from 1.3 to 3.5%. As a MLSA-based genetic distance below 5% is sufficient to join a genotype to a known species, all these clusters clearly belong to B. taylorii species [45]. Two genotypes were associated with the species B. doshiae (cluster F), of which one (A340) was more closely related to the R18 reference strain with a genetic distance of 0.7%, and another (A538) more distant which diverged by a distance of 4.5%. Distribution of Bartonella species and clusters in the rodent community is summarized in Table 1. The 63 different genotypes, the rodent species from where they were detected or isolated (as well the number of animal in which they were recoververd) and the corresponding Bartonella species and clusters are descripted in Table 2.

Bottom Line: Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts.Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents.Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USC INRA Bipar, Bartonella et Tiques, Maisons-Alfort, France.

ABSTRACT
Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus