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New Australovenator hind limb elements pertaining to the holotype reveal the most complete Neovenatorid leg.

White MA, Benson RB, Tischler TR, Hock SA, Cook AG, Barnes DG, Poropat SF, Wooldridge SJ, Sloan T, Sinapius GH, Elliott DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor).The metatarsus morphology varies with body size.The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.fossilised@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report new skeletal elements pertaining to the same individual which represents the holotype of Australovenator wintonensis, from the 'Matilda Site' in the Winton Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of western Queensland. The discovery of these new elements means that the hind limb of Australovenator is now the most completely understood hind limb among Neovenatoridae. The new hind limb elements include: the left fibula; left metatarsal IV; left pedal phalanges I-2, II-1, III-4, IV-2, IV-3; and right pedal phalanges, II-2 and III-1. The detailed descriptions are supported with three dimensional figures. These coupled with the completeness of the hind limb will increase the utility of Australovenator in comparisons with less complete neovenatorid genera. These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor). Hind limb length proportion comparisons indicate that the smaller neovenatorids Australovenator and Fukuiraptor possess more elongate and gracile hind limb elements than the larger Neovenator and Chilantaisaurus. Greater stride lengths to body size exist in both Fukuiraptor and Australovenator with the femur discovered to be proportionally shorter the rest of the hind limb length. Additionally Australovenator is identified as possessing the most elongate metatarsus. The metatarsus morphology varies with body size. The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

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Left metatarsal I.Left metatarsal I in: lateral (A & B); medial (C & D); ventral (E & F); dorsal (G & H); and distal (I & J) views.
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pone-0068649-g006: Left metatarsal I.Left metatarsal I in: lateral (A & B); medial (C & D); ventral (E & F); dorsal (G & H); and distal (I & J) views.

Mentions: The skeletal remains of Australovenator wintonensis[1] were discovered interspersed with the remains of a sauropod dinosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae[1]. The fossils were excavated from Australian Age of Dinosaurs Locality 85 (AODL 85) – the “Matilda site” on Elderslie station, approximately 60km northwest of Winton, Queensland, Australia. Samples from the Matilda underwent zircon dating indicating a Cenomanian age (ca. 95 Ma) for the site (Figure 6 in [2]) [2], [3]. The deposit was first identified by the landowners, who discovered large fragmented sauropod remains exposed on the surface. Excavation of the site demonstrated that the bones were being reworked from gunmetal blue-coloured clay, rich in plant debris (Figure 1; Figure S1). The plant material consists of a diverse range of macro and micro fauna flora [4]-[10]. The deposit was interpreted as an abandoned channel fill or oxbow lake [1]. Most of the specimens were found to be encased in a concretionary phosphatic crust. Although substantial skeletal remains of Austraovenator were reported in the description of the holotype [1], the preparation of concretions from AODL 85 continued following the publication of the paper, yielding new forelimb [11] and hind limb elements of Australovenator.


New Australovenator hind limb elements pertaining to the holotype reveal the most complete Neovenatorid leg.

White MA, Benson RB, Tischler TR, Hock SA, Cook AG, Barnes DG, Poropat SF, Wooldridge SJ, Sloan T, Sinapius GH, Elliott DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Left metatarsal I.Left metatarsal I in: lateral (A & B); medial (C & D); ventral (E & F); dorsal (G & H); and distal (I & J) views.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722220&req=5

pone-0068649-g006: Left metatarsal I.Left metatarsal I in: lateral (A & B); medial (C & D); ventral (E & F); dorsal (G & H); and distal (I & J) views.
Mentions: The skeletal remains of Australovenator wintonensis[1] were discovered interspersed with the remains of a sauropod dinosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae[1]. The fossils were excavated from Australian Age of Dinosaurs Locality 85 (AODL 85) – the “Matilda site” on Elderslie station, approximately 60km northwest of Winton, Queensland, Australia. Samples from the Matilda underwent zircon dating indicating a Cenomanian age (ca. 95 Ma) for the site (Figure 6 in [2]) [2], [3]. The deposit was first identified by the landowners, who discovered large fragmented sauropod remains exposed on the surface. Excavation of the site demonstrated that the bones were being reworked from gunmetal blue-coloured clay, rich in plant debris (Figure 1; Figure S1). The plant material consists of a diverse range of macro and micro fauna flora [4]-[10]. The deposit was interpreted as an abandoned channel fill or oxbow lake [1]. Most of the specimens were found to be encased in a concretionary phosphatic crust. Although substantial skeletal remains of Austraovenator were reported in the description of the holotype [1], the preparation of concretions from AODL 85 continued following the publication of the paper, yielding new forelimb [11] and hind limb elements of Australovenator.

Bottom Line: These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor).The metatarsus morphology varies with body size.The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.fossilised@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report new skeletal elements pertaining to the same individual which represents the holotype of Australovenator wintonensis, from the 'Matilda Site' in the Winton Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of western Queensland. The discovery of these new elements means that the hind limb of Australovenator is now the most completely understood hind limb among Neovenatoridae. The new hind limb elements include: the left fibula; left metatarsal IV; left pedal phalanges I-2, II-1, III-4, IV-2, IV-3; and right pedal phalanges, II-2 and III-1. The detailed descriptions are supported with three dimensional figures. These coupled with the completeness of the hind limb will increase the utility of Australovenator in comparisons with less complete neovenatorid genera. These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor). Hind limb length proportion comparisons indicate that the smaller neovenatorids Australovenator and Fukuiraptor possess more elongate and gracile hind limb elements than the larger Neovenator and Chilantaisaurus. Greater stride lengths to body size exist in both Fukuiraptor and Australovenator with the femur discovered to be proportionally shorter the rest of the hind limb length. Additionally Australovenator is identified as possessing the most elongate metatarsus. The metatarsus morphology varies with body size. The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

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