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New Australovenator hind limb elements pertaining to the holotype reveal the most complete Neovenatorid leg.

White MA, Benson RB, Tischler TR, Hock SA, Cook AG, Barnes DG, Poropat SF, Wooldridge SJ, Sloan T, Sinapius GH, Elliott DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor).The metatarsus morphology varies with body size.The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.fossilised@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report new skeletal elements pertaining to the same individual which represents the holotype of Australovenator wintonensis, from the 'Matilda Site' in the Winton Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of western Queensland. The discovery of these new elements means that the hind limb of Australovenator is now the most completely understood hind limb among Neovenatoridae. The new hind limb elements include: the left fibula; left metatarsal IV; left pedal phalanges I-2, II-1, III-4, IV-2, IV-3; and right pedal phalanges, II-2 and III-1. The detailed descriptions are supported with three dimensional figures. These coupled with the completeness of the hind limb will increase the utility of Australovenator in comparisons with less complete neovenatorid genera. These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor). Hind limb length proportion comparisons indicate that the smaller neovenatorids Australovenator and Fukuiraptor possess more elongate and gracile hind limb elements than the larger Neovenator and Chilantaisaurus. Greater stride lengths to body size exist in both Fukuiraptor and Australovenator with the femur discovered to be proportionally shorter the rest of the hind limb length. Additionally Australovenator is identified as possessing the most elongate metatarsus. The metatarsus morphology varies with body size. The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

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Right femur.Right femur in: cranial (A & B); caudal (C & D); lateral (E & F); medial (G & H); proximal (I & J); and distal (K & L) views. Abbreviations: ctf, crista tibiofibularis; dep, depression; eg, extensor groove; fg, flexor groove; ft, fourth trochanter; gt, greater trochanter; lt, lesser trochanter; mc, medial condyle; cf, caudal flange on caput; s, scar; 1-6 CT sections.
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pone-0068649-g002: Right femur.Right femur in: cranial (A & B); caudal (C & D); lateral (E & F); medial (G & H); proximal (I & J); and distal (K & L) views. Abbreviations: ctf, crista tibiofibularis; dep, depression; eg, extensor groove; fg, flexor groove; ft, fourth trochanter; gt, greater trochanter; lt, lesser trochanter; mc, medial condyle; cf, caudal flange on caput; s, scar; 1-6 CT sections.

Mentions: The following specimens were described in the initial description of Australovenator wintonensis[1]: the right femur (Figure 2; Figure S2), right and left tibiae (Figure 3; Figure S3), right fibula (Figure 4; Figure S4), right astragalus (Figure 5; Figure S5), left metatarsal I (Figure 6; Figure S6), and right metatarsals II (Figure 7; Figure S7) and III (Figure 8; Figure S8). Left metatarsal I was originally identified as a right element [1]. These specimens, or their counterparts from the limb of the opposite side, were adequately described [1]. Four pedal phalanges were figured and described as part of the original description [1]. Their descriptions have been revised as their correct positions are now known.


New Australovenator hind limb elements pertaining to the holotype reveal the most complete Neovenatorid leg.

White MA, Benson RB, Tischler TR, Hock SA, Cook AG, Barnes DG, Poropat SF, Wooldridge SJ, Sloan T, Sinapius GH, Elliott DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Right femur.Right femur in: cranial (A & B); caudal (C & D); lateral (E & F); medial (G & H); proximal (I & J); and distal (K & L) views. Abbreviations: ctf, crista tibiofibularis; dep, depression; eg, extensor groove; fg, flexor groove; ft, fourth trochanter; gt, greater trochanter; lt, lesser trochanter; mc, medial condyle; cf, caudal flange on caput; s, scar; 1-6 CT sections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722220&req=5

pone-0068649-g002: Right femur.Right femur in: cranial (A & B); caudal (C & D); lateral (E & F); medial (G & H); proximal (I & J); and distal (K & L) views. Abbreviations: ctf, crista tibiofibularis; dep, depression; eg, extensor groove; fg, flexor groove; ft, fourth trochanter; gt, greater trochanter; lt, lesser trochanter; mc, medial condyle; cf, caudal flange on caput; s, scar; 1-6 CT sections.
Mentions: The following specimens were described in the initial description of Australovenator wintonensis[1]: the right femur (Figure 2; Figure S2), right and left tibiae (Figure 3; Figure S3), right fibula (Figure 4; Figure S4), right astragalus (Figure 5; Figure S5), left metatarsal I (Figure 6; Figure S6), and right metatarsals II (Figure 7; Figure S7) and III (Figure 8; Figure S8). Left metatarsal I was originally identified as a right element [1]. These specimens, or their counterparts from the limb of the opposite side, were adequately described [1]. Four pedal phalanges were figured and described as part of the original description [1]. Their descriptions have been revised as their correct positions are now known.

Bottom Line: These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor).The metatarsus morphology varies with body size.The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.fossilised@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report new skeletal elements pertaining to the same individual which represents the holotype of Australovenator wintonensis, from the 'Matilda Site' in the Winton Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of western Queensland. The discovery of these new elements means that the hind limb of Australovenator is now the most completely understood hind limb among Neovenatoridae. The new hind limb elements include: the left fibula; left metatarsal IV; left pedal phalanges I-2, II-1, III-4, IV-2, IV-3; and right pedal phalanges, II-2 and III-1. The detailed descriptions are supported with three dimensional figures. These coupled with the completeness of the hind limb will increase the utility of Australovenator in comparisons with less complete neovenatorid genera. These specimens and the previously described hind limb elements of Australovenator are compared with other theropods classified as neovenatorids (including Neovenator, Chilantaisaurus, Fukuiraptor, Orkoraptor and Megaraptor). Hind limb length proportion comparisons indicate that the smaller neovenatorids Australovenator and Fukuiraptor possess more elongate and gracile hind limb elements than the larger Neovenator and Chilantaisaurus. Greater stride lengths to body size exist in both Fukuiraptor and Australovenator with the femur discovered to be proportionally shorter the rest of the hind limb length. Additionally Australovenator is identified as possessing the most elongate metatarsus. The metatarsus morphology varies with body size. The larger neoventorids possess a metatarsus with greater width but shorter length compared to smaller forms.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus