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Condition-dependent effects of mating on longevity and fecundity of female Medflies: the interplay between nutrition and age of mating.

Papanastasiou SA, Nakas CT, Carey JR, Papadopoulos NT - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: In various species mating exerts direct and indirect effects on female demographic traits ranging from life span shortening to behavioural shifts.Mating boosts egg production and reduces longevity of protein-fed females.These results contribute towards understanding the effects of mating, aging, resource allocation and their interactions on survival and female reproduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Volos, Magnisia, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: In various species mating exerts direct and indirect effects on female demographic traits ranging from life span shortening to behavioural shifts. A wealth of data regarding effects of nutrition on longevity and reproduction output also exists. Nonetheless, little is known regarding the interaction between the age of mating and nutrition on female fitness.

Methodology: We studied, the effects of protein deprivation and age of mating on female fitness traits, using a wild population of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly). We tested the hypotheses that (a) protein availability increases female lifespan and fecundity, (b) female longevity and egg production are independent of mating and the age of mating, and (c) female mating behaviour is independent of their age and nutritional status. Thus, we recorded the mating success and the copulation characteristics, as well as the egg production and survival of females mated at young or at old age and fed a full or a protein-deprived diet.

Results: Mating boosts egg production and reduces longevity of protein-fed females. On the contrary, mating increases the longevity of protein-deprived females. Mortality responses (negative or positive) to mating are expressed after a long lag phase. Old females are more receptive and less selective than young females regardless of the food regime.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that condition (nutritional status and age) defines the positive or negative output of mating in female medflies. These results contribute towards understanding the effects of mating, aging, resource allocation and their interactions on survival and female reproduction.

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Copulation duration (A) and latency time (B) of females fed a full (left) and a protein-deprived (right) diet.Asterisks (*) indicate significant differences (t-test, P<0.05).
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pone-0070181-g002: Copulation duration (A) and latency time (B) of females fed a full (left) and a protein-deprived (right) diet.Asterisks (*) indicate significant differences (t-test, P<0.05).

Mentions: Copulation duration was not affected by the nutritional status of females (P>0.05) but was significantly longer for the young females (t = −2.287, df = 252, P<0.05) regardless of the diet regime. However, assessing the effect of age of mating on copulation duration within each diet regime we found a significantly longer copulation only for the young protein-deprived females (t = 2.672, df = 100, P<0.05) (Fig. 2). Similarly, based on data pooled over the two female age categories, the nutritional status of females did not affect the copulation latency time (P>0.05). However, young females were significantly choosier than old females regardless of the diet (t = −2.974, df = 252, P<0.05) and within each diet regime (tprotein = 2.16, df = 149, P<0.05, tsugar = 2.0, df = 100, P<0.05) (Fig. 2).


Condition-dependent effects of mating on longevity and fecundity of female Medflies: the interplay between nutrition and age of mating.

Papanastasiou SA, Nakas CT, Carey JR, Papadopoulos NT - PLoS ONE (2013)

Copulation duration (A) and latency time (B) of females fed a full (left) and a protein-deprived (right) diet.Asterisks (*) indicate significant differences (t-test, P<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722191&req=5

pone-0070181-g002: Copulation duration (A) and latency time (B) of females fed a full (left) and a protein-deprived (right) diet.Asterisks (*) indicate significant differences (t-test, P<0.05).
Mentions: Copulation duration was not affected by the nutritional status of females (P>0.05) but was significantly longer for the young females (t = −2.287, df = 252, P<0.05) regardless of the diet regime. However, assessing the effect of age of mating on copulation duration within each diet regime we found a significantly longer copulation only for the young protein-deprived females (t = 2.672, df = 100, P<0.05) (Fig. 2). Similarly, based on data pooled over the two female age categories, the nutritional status of females did not affect the copulation latency time (P>0.05). However, young females were significantly choosier than old females regardless of the diet (t = −2.974, df = 252, P<0.05) and within each diet regime (tprotein = 2.16, df = 149, P<0.05, tsugar = 2.0, df = 100, P<0.05) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: In various species mating exerts direct and indirect effects on female demographic traits ranging from life span shortening to behavioural shifts.Mating boosts egg production and reduces longevity of protein-fed females.These results contribute towards understanding the effects of mating, aging, resource allocation and their interactions on survival and female reproduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Volos, Magnisia, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: In various species mating exerts direct and indirect effects on female demographic traits ranging from life span shortening to behavioural shifts. A wealth of data regarding effects of nutrition on longevity and reproduction output also exists. Nonetheless, little is known regarding the interaction between the age of mating and nutrition on female fitness.

Methodology: We studied, the effects of protein deprivation and age of mating on female fitness traits, using a wild population of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly). We tested the hypotheses that (a) protein availability increases female lifespan and fecundity, (b) female longevity and egg production are independent of mating and the age of mating, and (c) female mating behaviour is independent of their age and nutritional status. Thus, we recorded the mating success and the copulation characteristics, as well as the egg production and survival of females mated at young or at old age and fed a full or a protein-deprived diet.

Results: Mating boosts egg production and reduces longevity of protein-fed females. On the contrary, mating increases the longevity of protein-deprived females. Mortality responses (negative or positive) to mating are expressed after a long lag phase. Old females are more receptive and less selective than young females regardless of the food regime.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that condition (nutritional status and age) defines the positive or negative output of mating in female medflies. These results contribute towards understanding the effects of mating, aging, resource allocation and their interactions on survival and female reproduction.

Show MeSH