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UVB exposure of farm animals: study on a food-based strategy to bridge the gap between current vitamin D intakes and dietary targets.

Schutkowski A, Krämer J, Kluge H, Hirche F, Krombholz A, Theumer T, Stangl GI - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3.Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001).In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.

ABSTRACT
Vitamin D deficiency is a global health problem. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) B radiation for improving vitamin D3 content of eggs and meat. In a two-factorial design hens that received diets with 0 (-D3) or 3,000 IU (+D3) vitamin D3/kg were non-exposed (-UVB) or exposed to UVB radiation (+UVB) for 3 h daily over 4 weeks. Data show that UVB radiation was very effective in raising the vitamin D3 content of egg yolk and meat. Egg yolk from +UVB/-D3 hens had a higher vitamin D3 content (17.5±7.2 µg/100 g dry matter (DM)) than those from the -UVB/+D3 group (5.2±2.4 µg/100 g DM, p<0.01). Vitamin D3 content in egg yolk of vitamin D3-supplemented hens could be further increased by UVB radiation (32.4±10.9 µg/100 g DM). The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3. Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001). In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources.

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Bone stability in response to UVB exposure and dietary vitamin D3.Data in represent mean ± SD (n = 9) of tibiotarsus stability of non-treated (-UVB) or UVB-treated (+UVB) hens that were fed either a vitamin D3-deficient (-D3) or vitamin D3-adequate diet (+D3), respectively. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Classification factors were UVB exposure, vitamin D3 in the diet, and the interaction between both factors. Effect of vitamin D3: p<0.10, vitamin D3× UVB: p<0.01. Individual means between two groups were compared by the unpaired Student’s t-test, **p<0.01.
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pone-0069418-g006: Bone stability in response to UVB exposure and dietary vitamin D3.Data in represent mean ± SD (n = 9) of tibiotarsus stability of non-treated (-UVB) or UVB-treated (+UVB) hens that were fed either a vitamin D3-deficient (-D3) or vitamin D3-adequate diet (+D3), respectively. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Classification factors were UVB exposure, vitamin D3 in the diet, and the interaction between both factors. Effect of vitamin D3: p<0.10, vitamin D3× UVB: p<0.01. Individual means between two groups were compared by the unpaired Student’s t-test, **p<0.01.

Mentions: Hens non-exposed to UVB radiation that received the vitamin D3-deficient diet revealed a lower mechanical stability of tibiotarsus than hens from the other groups (Figure 6, p<0.01). Two-way ANOVA data revealed an interactive effect of dietary vitamin D3 and UVB exposure on tibiotarsus stability (p<0.01, Table S1). In order to investigate possible effects of UVB radiation on folate status, the concentrations of folate in plasma and liver of the hens were determined. Neither the concentration of folate in plasma (-UVB/−D3 group, 49.8±18.6 nmol/l; -UVB/+D3 group, 45.5±17.4 nmol/l; +UVB/−D3 group, 56.8±21.5 nmol/l; +UVB/+D3 group, 41.5±10.4 nmol/l; mean ± SD), nor that in liver (-UVB/−D3 group, 10.5±1.1 µg/g; -UVB/+D3 group, 9.8±2.3 µg/g; +UVB/−D3 group, 10.1±1.7 µg/g; +UVB/+D3 group, 10.5±1.4 µg/g; mean ± SD) was influenced by dietary vitamin D3 and UVB exposure, respectively. This was confirmed by the two-way ANOVA data (Table S1).


UVB exposure of farm animals: study on a food-based strategy to bridge the gap between current vitamin D intakes and dietary targets.

Schutkowski A, Krämer J, Kluge H, Hirche F, Krombholz A, Theumer T, Stangl GI - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bone stability in response to UVB exposure and dietary vitamin D3.Data in represent mean ± SD (n = 9) of tibiotarsus stability of non-treated (-UVB) or UVB-treated (+UVB) hens that were fed either a vitamin D3-deficient (-D3) or vitamin D3-adequate diet (+D3), respectively. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Classification factors were UVB exposure, vitamin D3 in the diet, and the interaction between both factors. Effect of vitamin D3: p<0.10, vitamin D3× UVB: p<0.01. Individual means between two groups were compared by the unpaired Student’s t-test, **p<0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3722170&req=5

pone-0069418-g006: Bone stability in response to UVB exposure and dietary vitamin D3.Data in represent mean ± SD (n = 9) of tibiotarsus stability of non-treated (-UVB) or UVB-treated (+UVB) hens that were fed either a vitamin D3-deficient (-D3) or vitamin D3-adequate diet (+D3), respectively. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Classification factors were UVB exposure, vitamin D3 in the diet, and the interaction between both factors. Effect of vitamin D3: p<0.10, vitamin D3× UVB: p<0.01. Individual means between two groups were compared by the unpaired Student’s t-test, **p<0.01.
Mentions: Hens non-exposed to UVB radiation that received the vitamin D3-deficient diet revealed a lower mechanical stability of tibiotarsus than hens from the other groups (Figure 6, p<0.01). Two-way ANOVA data revealed an interactive effect of dietary vitamin D3 and UVB exposure on tibiotarsus stability (p<0.01, Table S1). In order to investigate possible effects of UVB radiation on folate status, the concentrations of folate in plasma and liver of the hens were determined. Neither the concentration of folate in plasma (-UVB/−D3 group, 49.8±18.6 nmol/l; -UVB/+D3 group, 45.5±17.4 nmol/l; +UVB/−D3 group, 56.8±21.5 nmol/l; +UVB/+D3 group, 41.5±10.4 nmol/l; mean ± SD), nor that in liver (-UVB/−D3 group, 10.5±1.1 µg/g; -UVB/+D3 group, 9.8±2.3 µg/g; +UVB/−D3 group, 10.1±1.7 µg/g; +UVB/+D3 group, 10.5±1.4 µg/g; mean ± SD) was influenced by dietary vitamin D3 and UVB exposure, respectively. This was confirmed by the two-way ANOVA data (Table S1).

Bottom Line: The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3.Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001).In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.

ABSTRACT
Vitamin D deficiency is a global health problem. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) B radiation for improving vitamin D3 content of eggs and meat. In a two-factorial design hens that received diets with 0 (-D3) or 3,000 IU (+D3) vitamin D3/kg were non-exposed (-UVB) or exposed to UVB radiation (+UVB) for 3 h daily over 4 weeks. Data show that UVB radiation was very effective in raising the vitamin D3 content of egg yolk and meat. Egg yolk from +UVB/-D3 hens had a higher vitamin D3 content (17.5±7.2 µg/100 g dry matter (DM)) than those from the -UVB/+D3 group (5.2±2.4 µg/100 g DM, p<0.01). Vitamin D3 content in egg yolk of vitamin D3-supplemented hens could be further increased by UVB radiation (32.4±10.9 µg/100 g DM). The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3. Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001). In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus