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The global burden of congenital heart disease.

Hoffman JIe - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates.Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner.Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

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Fertility rate versus income per capita for several countries on different continents. The continents are colour coded, and the area of the circles is proportional to each country’s population. Note that countries in Africa with high fertility rates are at the lowest end of the income scale.
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Figure 9: Fertility rate versus income per capita for several countries on different continents. The continents are colour coded, and the area of the circles is proportional to each country’s population. Note that countries in Africa with high fertility rates are at the lowest end of the income scale.

Mentions: Treating congenital heart disease, however, is always going to be expensive, and it may be worth giving more thought to its prevention. An approach that has been shown to be effective in a variety of countries is to educate women and improve efforts for family planning. The relationships between excessive fertility and income (Fig. 9) and child mortality (Fig. 10) suggest that reduction in fertility would be more effective than any other intervention we could make at present.


The global burden of congenital heart disease.

Hoffman JIe - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Fertility rate versus income per capita for several countries on different continents. The continents are colour coded, and the area of the circles is proportional to each country’s population. Note that countries in Africa with high fertility rates are at the lowest end of the income scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721933&req=5

Figure 9: Fertility rate versus income per capita for several countries on different continents. The continents are colour coded, and the area of the circles is proportional to each country’s population. Note that countries in Africa with high fertility rates are at the lowest end of the income scale.
Mentions: Treating congenital heart disease, however, is always going to be expensive, and it may be worth giving more thought to its prevention. An approach that has been shown to be effective in a variety of countries is to educate women and improve efforts for family planning. The relationships between excessive fertility and income (Fig. 9) and child mortality (Fig. 10) suggest that reduction in fertility would be more effective than any other intervention we could make at present.

Bottom Line: Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates.Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner.Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus