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The global burden of congenital heart disease.

Hoffman JIe - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates.Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner.Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Total annual births of children with congenital heart disease by continent, based on Table 1 and data on total births. The panel at the side indicates the population ranges of the different countries.
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Figure 2: Total annual births of children with congenital heart disease by continent, based on Table 1 and data on total births. The panel at the side indicates the population ranges of the different countries.

Mentions: As far as we can tell, the incidence of congenital heart disease is similar in all countries. There are some minor differences in types of congenital heart disease by country. For example, China and Japan have a higher incidence of subpulmonic ventricular septal defects, whereas coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis may be slightly less common in Asian countries. These variations do not appear to cause major differences in total incidence of congenital heart disease. Therefore, because we have good data on the annual number of births in different countries (Fig. 1), we can estimate how many children are born with congenital heart disease in different countries and continents (Fig. 2)


The global burden of congenital heart disease.

Hoffman JIe - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Total annual births of children with congenital heart disease by continent, based on Table 1 and data on total births. The panel at the side indicates the population ranges of the different countries.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721933&req=5

Figure 2: Total annual births of children with congenital heart disease by continent, based on Table 1 and data on total births. The panel at the side indicates the population ranges of the different countries.
Mentions: As far as we can tell, the incidence of congenital heart disease is similar in all countries. There are some minor differences in types of congenital heart disease by country. For example, China and Japan have a higher incidence of subpulmonic ventricular septal defects, whereas coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis may be slightly less common in Asian countries. These variations do not appear to cause major differences in total incidence of congenital heart disease. Therefore, because we have good data on the annual number of births in different countries (Fig. 1), we can estimate how many children are born with congenital heart disease in different countries and continents (Fig. 2)

Bottom Line: Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates.Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner.Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus