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The prevalence and distribution of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in Kasese district, Uganda.

Mondo CK, Otim MA, Akol G, Musoke R, Orem J - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Bottom Line: Thirty-one per cent of females had fasting blood sugar levels (FBS) ≥ 6.1 mmol/l while 10% of males had FBS > 6.1 mmol/l.This study presents evidence on the magnitude of NCDs, their risk factors and gender distribution in a rural population in Uganda, a poor country in east-central Africa.These data, when combined with urban population data, could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and plans of action in Uganda.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. do2011@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: To date there has been no population-based survey of the major risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCD) in Uganda. Hospital-based data from urban centres report an increasing burden of NCDs in Uganda. This population-based survey aimed to describe the prevalence of risk factors for NCDs in a rural Ugandan district.

Methods: The survey was conducted using the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases (STEPS) methodology. Participants (n = 611) were residents of the Kasese district selected in a one-step, complete survey of a rural district. Standardised international protocols were used to record history of disease, and measure behavioural risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity), physical characteristics [weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure (BP)], fasting blood glucose (BG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels. Data were analysed using simple descriptive analysis.

Results: In this sample, the prevalence of hypertension (systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg) was 22.1% for men and 20.5% for women. Fifteen per cent of men and 16.8% of women were overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)] and 4.9% of men and 9.0% of women were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Nine per cent of participants were diabetic, 7.2% ate five or more combined servings of fruit per day while only 1.2% ate five or more combined servings of vegetables per day. Fifty-one per cent of the population were physically inactive and 9.6% were daily smokers. Thirty-one per cent of females had fasting blood sugar levels (FBS) ≥ 6.1 mmol/l while 10% of males had FBS > 6.1 mmol/l.

Conclusion: This study presents evidence on the magnitude of NCDs, their risk factors and gender distribution in a rural population in Uganda, a poor country in east-central Africa. These data, when combined with urban population data, could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and plans of action in Uganda.

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Fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels. (a) 19% had FBS of 6.1–6.9 mmol/l; 9% ≥ 7.0 mmol/l. (b) 31% of females had FBS ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, 10% of males ≥ 6.1 mmol/l.
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Figure 5: Fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels. (a) 19% had FBS of 6.1–6.9 mmol/l; 9% ≥ 7.0 mmol/l. (b) 31% of females had FBS ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, 10% of males ≥ 6.1 mmol/l.

Mentions: Ten per cent of males had fasting blood sugar levels > 6.0 mmol/l compared to 33% of females, while 12.5% of male had a positive family history of diabetes mellitus (DM) and 3.5% were on treatment for DM. Sixteen per cent of females had a positive family history of DM and 2.2% were on treatment for DM (Figs 4, 5).


The prevalence and distribution of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in Kasese district, Uganda.

Mondo CK, Otim MA, Akol G, Musoke R, Orem J - Cardiovasc J Afr (2013)

Fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels. (a) 19% had FBS of 6.1–6.9 mmol/l; 9% ≥ 7.0 mmol/l. (b) 31% of females had FBS ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, 10% of males ≥ 6.1 mmol/l.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721879&req=5

Figure 5: Fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels. (a) 19% had FBS of 6.1–6.9 mmol/l; 9% ≥ 7.0 mmol/l. (b) 31% of females had FBS ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, 10% of males ≥ 6.1 mmol/l.
Mentions: Ten per cent of males had fasting blood sugar levels > 6.0 mmol/l compared to 33% of females, while 12.5% of male had a positive family history of diabetes mellitus (DM) and 3.5% were on treatment for DM. Sixteen per cent of females had a positive family history of DM and 2.2% were on treatment for DM (Figs 4, 5).

Bottom Line: Thirty-one per cent of females had fasting blood sugar levels (FBS) ≥ 6.1 mmol/l while 10% of males had FBS > 6.1 mmol/l.This study presents evidence on the magnitude of NCDs, their risk factors and gender distribution in a rural population in Uganda, a poor country in east-central Africa.These data, when combined with urban population data, could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and plans of action in Uganda.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. do2011@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: To date there has been no population-based survey of the major risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCD) in Uganda. Hospital-based data from urban centres report an increasing burden of NCDs in Uganda. This population-based survey aimed to describe the prevalence of risk factors for NCDs in a rural Ugandan district.

Methods: The survey was conducted using the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases (STEPS) methodology. Participants (n = 611) were residents of the Kasese district selected in a one-step, complete survey of a rural district. Standardised international protocols were used to record history of disease, and measure behavioural risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity), physical characteristics [weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure (BP)], fasting blood glucose (BG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels. Data were analysed using simple descriptive analysis.

Results: In this sample, the prevalence of hypertension (systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg) was 22.1% for men and 20.5% for women. Fifteen per cent of men and 16.8% of women were overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)] and 4.9% of men and 9.0% of women were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Nine per cent of participants were diabetic, 7.2% ate five or more combined servings of fruit per day while only 1.2% ate five or more combined servings of vegetables per day. Fifty-one per cent of the population were physically inactive and 9.6% were daily smokers. Thirty-one per cent of females had fasting blood sugar levels (FBS) ≥ 6.1 mmol/l while 10% of males had FBS > 6.1 mmol/l.

Conclusion: This study presents evidence on the magnitude of NCDs, their risk factors and gender distribution in a rural population in Uganda, a poor country in east-central Africa. These data, when combined with urban population data, could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and plans of action in Uganda.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus