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The 30-year cardiovascular risk profile of South Africans with diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, pre-diabetes or normoglycaemia: the Bellville, South Africa pilot study.

Matsha TE, Hassan MS, Kidd M, Erasmus RT - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

Bottom Line: High CVD risk (> 20%) was evident in normoglycaemic and younger subjects (under 35 years).The high lifetime risk in normoglycaemic and younger subjects may be considered a warning that CVD might take on epidemic proportions in the near future in this country.We recommend the inclusion of education on CVD in school and university curricula.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bio-Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Science, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this pilot study was to assess the 30-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the South Africa population of mixed-ancestry in individuals with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia, and undiagnosed and self-reported diabetes. Participants were drawn from an urban community of the Bellville South suburb of Cape Town. In total, 583 subjects without a history of CVD were eligible for lifetime CVD risk estimation. Gender-specific prediction for CVD risk was calculated using the 30-year CVD interactive risk calculator. High CVD risk (> 20%) was evident in normoglycaemic and younger subjects (under 35 years). The significant predictors of CVD were sibling history of diabetes, and triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycated haemoglobin levels (p < 0.001). The high lifetime risk in normoglycaemic and younger subjects may be considered a warning that CVD might take on epidemic proportions in the near future in this country. We recommend the inclusion of education on CVD in school and university curricula.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Covariance analysis with age as covariate between the subjects with IFG, IGT, newly diagnosed diabetes (undiagnosed DM), self-reported diabetes (known DM) and subjects with normal glucose tolerance (normal). Significant differences between the groups are denoted by the letters, a–d. No significant differences were observed between those with IFG and normal glucose tolerance. Vertical bars denote 0.95 confidence interval.
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Figure 3: Covariance analysis with age as covariate between the subjects with IFG, IGT, newly diagnosed diabetes (undiagnosed DM), self-reported diabetes (known DM) and subjects with normal glucose tolerance (normal). Significant differences between the groups are denoted by the letters, a–d. No significant differences were observed between those with IFG and normal glucose tolerance. Vertical bars denote 0.95 confidence interval.

Mentions: The mean 30-year CVD risk among individuals without diabetes was 33.6%, while in those with undiagnosed and self-reported diabetes it was more than 50%, (p < 0.001) (Fig. 3). In normoglycaemic females who were of normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), the CVD risk was significantly lower (p = 0.007) than in obese females, while in hyperglycaemic states, observed differences were not significant (Table 3). In the best-subsets linear regression analysis, the significant predictors of CVD were sibling history of diabetes, and TG, LDL-C and HbA1c levels (p < 0.001) (Table 4). These variables accounted for 46.3% of the variation in the calculated CVD risk.


The 30-year cardiovascular risk profile of South Africans with diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, pre-diabetes or normoglycaemia: the Bellville, South Africa pilot study.

Matsha TE, Hassan MS, Kidd M, Erasmus RT - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

Covariance analysis with age as covariate between the subjects with IFG, IGT, newly diagnosed diabetes (undiagnosed DM), self-reported diabetes (known DM) and subjects with normal glucose tolerance (normal). Significant differences between the groups are denoted by the letters, a–d. No significant differences were observed between those with IFG and normal glucose tolerance. Vertical bars denote 0.95 confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721868&req=5

Figure 3: Covariance analysis with age as covariate between the subjects with IFG, IGT, newly diagnosed diabetes (undiagnosed DM), self-reported diabetes (known DM) and subjects with normal glucose tolerance (normal). Significant differences between the groups are denoted by the letters, a–d. No significant differences were observed between those with IFG and normal glucose tolerance. Vertical bars denote 0.95 confidence interval.
Mentions: The mean 30-year CVD risk among individuals without diabetes was 33.6%, while in those with undiagnosed and self-reported diabetes it was more than 50%, (p < 0.001) (Fig. 3). In normoglycaemic females who were of normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), the CVD risk was significantly lower (p = 0.007) than in obese females, while in hyperglycaemic states, observed differences were not significant (Table 3). In the best-subsets linear regression analysis, the significant predictors of CVD were sibling history of diabetes, and TG, LDL-C and HbA1c levels (p < 0.001) (Table 4). These variables accounted for 46.3% of the variation in the calculated CVD risk.

Bottom Line: High CVD risk (> 20%) was evident in normoglycaemic and younger subjects (under 35 years).The high lifetime risk in normoglycaemic and younger subjects may be considered a warning that CVD might take on epidemic proportions in the near future in this country.We recommend the inclusion of education on CVD in school and university curricula.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bio-Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Science, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this pilot study was to assess the 30-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the South Africa population of mixed-ancestry in individuals with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia, and undiagnosed and self-reported diabetes. Participants were drawn from an urban community of the Bellville South suburb of Cape Town. In total, 583 subjects without a history of CVD were eligible for lifetime CVD risk estimation. Gender-specific prediction for CVD risk was calculated using the 30-year CVD interactive risk calculator. High CVD risk (> 20%) was evident in normoglycaemic and younger subjects (under 35 years). The significant predictors of CVD were sibling history of diabetes, and triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycated haemoglobin levels (p < 0.001). The high lifetime risk in normoglycaemic and younger subjects may be considered a warning that CVD might take on epidemic proportions in the near future in this country. We recommend the inclusion of education on CVD in school and university curricula.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus