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Obesity and its health impact in Africa: a systematic review.

Adeboye B, Bermano G, Rolland C - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

Bottom Line: Five electronic databases were searched.Of 720 potentially relevant articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria.Inflammatory marker levels were significantly elevated among Africans compared with Caucasians.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and its association with co-morbidities in Africa are on the rise. This systematic review examines evidence of obesity and its association with co-morbidities within the African continent. Comparative studies conducted in Africa on adults 17 years and older with mean body mass index (BMI) ≥ 28 kg/m(2) were included. Five electronic databases were searched. Surveys, case-control and cohort studies from January 2000 to July 2010 were evaluated. Of 720 potentially relevant articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of obesity was higher in urban than rural subjects with significant increases in obesity rates among women. Inflammatory marker levels were significantly elevated among Africans compared with Caucasians. The co-relationship between obesity and chronic diseases was also highlighted. This systematic review demonstrates that while obesity remains an area of significant public health importance to Africans, particularly in urban areas, there is little evidence of proper diagnosis, treatment and/or prevention.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of literature search.
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Figure 1: Summary of literature search.

Mentions: The initial search generated 720 titles of potentially relevant articles. Further scanning of titles and abstracts yielded 58 potentially relevant articles for which full texts were obtained. A total of 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Fig. 1 outlines a summary of the selection process with reasons for the exclusions.


Obesity and its health impact in Africa: a systematic review.

Adeboye B, Bermano G, Rolland C - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

Summary of literature search.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721807&req=5

Figure 1: Summary of literature search.
Mentions: The initial search generated 720 titles of potentially relevant articles. Further scanning of titles and abstracts yielded 58 potentially relevant articles for which full texts were obtained. A total of 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Fig. 1 outlines a summary of the selection process with reasons for the exclusions.

Bottom Line: Five electronic databases were searched.Of 720 potentially relevant articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria.Inflammatory marker levels were significantly elevated among Africans compared with Caucasians.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

ABSTRACT
Obesity and its association with co-morbidities in Africa are on the rise. This systematic review examines evidence of obesity and its association with co-morbidities within the African continent. Comparative studies conducted in Africa on adults 17 years and older with mean body mass index (BMI) ≥ 28 kg/m(2) were included. Five electronic databases were searched. Surveys, case-control and cohort studies from January 2000 to July 2010 were evaluated. Of 720 potentially relevant articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of obesity was higher in urban than rural subjects with significant increases in obesity rates among women. Inflammatory marker levels were significantly elevated among Africans compared with Caucasians. The co-relationship between obesity and chronic diseases was also highlighted. This systematic review demonstrates that while obesity remains an area of significant public health importance to Africans, particularly in urban areas, there is little evidence of proper diagnosis, treatment and/or prevention.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus