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The promise of computer-assisted auscultation in screening for structural heart disease and clinical teaching.

Zühlke L, Myer L, Mayosi BM - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

Bottom Line: In Africa, however, we face a shortage of physicians and have the lowest health personnel-to-population ratio in the world.One of the proposed solutions for tackling this crisis is the adoption of health technologies and product innovations to support different cadres of health workers as part of task shifting.This article reviews potential clinical applications of CAA.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Adolescent and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Liesl.zuhlke@uct.ac.za

ABSTRACT
Cardiac auscultation has been the central clinical tool for the diagnosis of valvular and other structural heart diseases for over a century. Physicians acquire competence in this technique through considerable training and experience. In Africa, however, we face a shortage of physicians and have the lowest health personnel-to-population ratio in the world. One of the proposed solutions for tackling this crisis is the adoption of health technologies and product innovations to support different cadres of health workers as part of task shifting. Computer-assisted auscultation (CAA) uses a digital stethoscope combined with acoustic neural networking to provide a visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, and analyses the recordings to distinguish between innocent and pathological murmurs. In so doing, CAA may serve as an objective tool for the screening of structural heart disease and facilitate the teaching of cardiac auscultation. This article reviews potential clinical applications of CAA.

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The computer interface, as displayed on a laptop computer, depicts the areas of auscultation, visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, as well as ECG. (Reproduced with the permission of Mr Thys Cronje.)
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Figure 1: The computer interface, as displayed on a laptop computer, depicts the areas of auscultation, visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, as well as ECG. (Reproduced with the permission of Mr Thys Cronje.)

Mentions: The CAA provides a spectral and temporal analysis of heart sounds and a graphic display of the energy profiles relating to systolic and diastolic murmurs (Fig. 1).14 The quantitative measurement of the intensity of the heart sounds and murmurs in the spectral display, which is recorded simultaneously with the waveform of the sounds, allows objective classification into normal and abnormal sounds (Fig. 2).15 Signals obtained electronically may be subjected to objective visual and numerical analysis, transmitted to distant sites, and stored for medical and research purposes.


The promise of computer-assisted auscultation in screening for structural heart disease and clinical teaching.

Zühlke L, Myer L, Mayosi BM - Cardiovasc J Afr (2012)

The computer interface, as displayed on a laptop computer, depicts the areas of auscultation, visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, as well as ECG. (Reproduced with the permission of Mr Thys Cronje.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3721800&req=5

Figure 1: The computer interface, as displayed on a laptop computer, depicts the areas of auscultation, visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, as well as ECG. (Reproduced with the permission of Mr Thys Cronje.)
Mentions: The CAA provides a spectral and temporal analysis of heart sounds and a graphic display of the energy profiles relating to systolic and diastolic murmurs (Fig. 1).14 The quantitative measurement of the intensity of the heart sounds and murmurs in the spectral display, which is recorded simultaneously with the waveform of the sounds, allows objective classification into normal and abnormal sounds (Fig. 2).15 Signals obtained electronically may be subjected to objective visual and numerical analysis, transmitted to distant sites, and stored for medical and research purposes.

Bottom Line: In Africa, however, we face a shortage of physicians and have the lowest health personnel-to-population ratio in the world.One of the proposed solutions for tackling this crisis is the adoption of health technologies and product innovations to support different cadres of health workers as part of task shifting.This article reviews potential clinical applications of CAA.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Adolescent and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Liesl.zuhlke@uct.ac.za

ABSTRACT
Cardiac auscultation has been the central clinical tool for the diagnosis of valvular and other structural heart diseases for over a century. Physicians acquire competence in this technique through considerable training and experience. In Africa, however, we face a shortage of physicians and have the lowest health personnel-to-population ratio in the world. One of the proposed solutions for tackling this crisis is the adoption of health technologies and product innovations to support different cadres of health workers as part of task shifting. Computer-assisted auscultation (CAA) uses a digital stethoscope combined with acoustic neural networking to provide a visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, and analyses the recordings to distinguish between innocent and pathological murmurs. In so doing, CAA may serve as an objective tool for the screening of structural heart disease and facilitate the teaching of cardiac auscultation. This article reviews potential clinical applications of CAA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus