Limits...
Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial.

Kerr B, Hawkins TL, Herman R, Barnes S, Kaufmann S, Fraser K, Ma IW - Med Educ Online (2013)

Bottom Line: Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19).The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment.It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence.

Methods: Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop.

Results: Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all). However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group). At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived.

Discussion: The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

One-month retention scores of participants (N=8) in the traditional case-based interactive workshop and simulation-based workshop. (a) Knowledge assessment scores; (b) self-reported comfort in participating in the care of the medically complicated pregnant patient; (c) self-reported comfort in evaluating a pregnant patient with shortness of breath; and (d) self-reported comfort in managing shortness of breath in a pregnant patient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3717090&req=5

Figure 0002: One-month retention scores of participants (N=8) in the traditional case-based interactive workshop and simulation-based workshop. (a) Knowledge assessment scores; (b) self-reported comfort in participating in the care of the medically complicated pregnant patient; (c) self-reported comfort in evaluating a pregnant patient with shortness of breath; and (d) self-reported comfort in managing shortness of breath in a pregnant patient.

Mentions: MCQ scores increased post-workshop for the traditional group but declined at 1-month (52.5±12.6%, 62.5±12.6%, and 40.0±8.2%, respectively, Fig. 2a). MCQ score pre-workshop, post-workshop, and at 1-month decreased steadily for the simulation group (72.5±17.1%, 50.0±18.2, and 37.5±17.1%, respectively).


Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial.

Kerr B, Hawkins TL, Herman R, Barnes S, Kaufmann S, Fraser K, Ma IW - Med Educ Online (2013)

One-month retention scores of participants (N=8) in the traditional case-based interactive workshop and simulation-based workshop. (a) Knowledge assessment scores; (b) self-reported comfort in participating in the care of the medically complicated pregnant patient; (c) self-reported comfort in evaluating a pregnant patient with shortness of breath; and (d) self-reported comfort in managing shortness of breath in a pregnant patient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3717090&req=5

Figure 0002: One-month retention scores of participants (N=8) in the traditional case-based interactive workshop and simulation-based workshop. (a) Knowledge assessment scores; (b) self-reported comfort in participating in the care of the medically complicated pregnant patient; (c) self-reported comfort in evaluating a pregnant patient with shortness of breath; and (d) self-reported comfort in managing shortness of breath in a pregnant patient.
Mentions: MCQ scores increased post-workshop for the traditional group but declined at 1-month (52.5±12.6%, 62.5±12.6%, and 40.0±8.2%, respectively, Fig. 2a). MCQ score pre-workshop, post-workshop, and at 1-month decreased steadily for the simulation group (72.5±17.1%, 50.0±18.2, and 37.5±17.1%, respectively).

Bottom Line: Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19).The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment.It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence.

Methods: Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop.

Results: Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all). However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group). At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived.

Discussion: The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus