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The destiny of an ace: Algimantas Otanas Narakas (1927-1993).

Taleb C, Nectoux E, Awada T, Liverneaux P - J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Inj (2013)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Hand Surgery Department, Strasbourg University Hospitals, Illkirch 67403, France. philippe.liverneaux@chru-strasbourg.fr.

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A complete history of brachial plexus surgery could not be written without the inclusion of Algimantas Narakas... Chronic osteomyelitis of the left tibia and the right hip subsequently developed, and Nakaras was sent to undergo heliotherapy in the Swiss Alps (Figure 1)... However, neither the sun, nor the altitude, nor the quietness of the sanatorium could heal the boy... The procedure lasted 13 hours... Narakas’ results confirmed Millesi’s work on nerve repair by interfascicular growth as his clinical outcomes were found satisfying even when dealing with extensive soft tissue loss... However, unlike Gilbert, Narakas systematically added two stitches to the anastomosis to enhance both nerve orientation and mechanical resistance of the suture... The duration of surgical intervention was dramatically decreased, in large part thanks to the biological glue, while increasing the overall success of the microsurgical procedure... Narakas particularly favored intraplexualneurotization to address lesions involving root avulsions... Indeed, he believed functional outcome would prove better as intraplexualneurotizations involved a greater amount of motorneurons... Narakas was the first to introduce a minimally invasive surgical concept for brachial plexus surgery... He thus developed the epidemiological rule on intraplexal lesion causes, the “7 times 70%” rule: 70% of cases involved road and street accidents, 70% of these accidents, motorcyclists were the victims, 70% of these victims presented with combined injuries, 70% of these lesions were supraclavicular, 70% of these lesions involved at least one nerve root avulsion, 70% of these avulsions involved a C7-C8-T1 level nerve root, and 70% of these avulsions developed chronic pain... EN: translation of the manuscript from French to English... All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

No MeSH data available.


ID picture of Narakas in the 1950’s. Narakas was at this time an apatrid. With courtesy of Diane Narakas.
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Figure 2: ID picture of Narakas in the 1950’s. Narakas was at this time an apatrid. With courtesy of Diane Narakas.

Mentions: Narakas graduated from the Lausanne’s University Medical School in 1957. His future at last seemed assured. However, as they had many years earlier, politics once more cruelly interfered with his destiny. After German and Russian occupation, Lithuania was ceded to the Soviet block in 1944. Although unaware until he received his diploma, these political changes would ultimately deny him the right to practice medicine. Narakas became a man without a country: no longer Lithuanian, and with no possibility of becoming a Soviet (Figure 2). He would eventually wait 18 years to receive a Swiss passport. Between 1944 and 1962, his statelessness forced him to stay on in the Swiss territory, and kept him from practicing medicine.


The destiny of an ace: Algimantas Otanas Narakas (1927-1993).

Taleb C, Nectoux E, Awada T, Liverneaux P - J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Inj (2013)

ID picture of Narakas in the 1950’s. Narakas was at this time an apatrid. With courtesy of Diane Narakas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3717069&req=5

Figure 2: ID picture of Narakas in the 1950’s. Narakas was at this time an apatrid. With courtesy of Diane Narakas.
Mentions: Narakas graduated from the Lausanne’s University Medical School in 1957. His future at last seemed assured. However, as they had many years earlier, politics once more cruelly interfered with his destiny. After German and Russian occupation, Lithuania was ceded to the Soviet block in 1944. Although unaware until he received his diploma, these political changes would ultimately deny him the right to practice medicine. Narakas became a man without a country: no longer Lithuanian, and with no possibility of becoming a Soviet (Figure 2). He would eventually wait 18 years to receive a Swiss passport. Between 1944 and 1962, his statelessness forced him to stay on in the Swiss territory, and kept him from practicing medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Hand Surgery Department, Strasbourg University Hospitals, Illkirch 67403, France. philippe.liverneaux@chru-strasbourg.fr.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

A complete history of brachial plexus surgery could not be written without the inclusion of Algimantas Narakas... Chronic osteomyelitis of the left tibia and the right hip subsequently developed, and Nakaras was sent to undergo heliotherapy in the Swiss Alps (Figure 1)... However, neither the sun, nor the altitude, nor the quietness of the sanatorium could heal the boy... The procedure lasted 13 hours... Narakas’ results confirmed Millesi’s work on nerve repair by interfascicular growth as his clinical outcomes were found satisfying even when dealing with extensive soft tissue loss... However, unlike Gilbert, Narakas systematically added two stitches to the anastomosis to enhance both nerve orientation and mechanical resistance of the suture... The duration of surgical intervention was dramatically decreased, in large part thanks to the biological glue, while increasing the overall success of the microsurgical procedure... Narakas particularly favored intraplexualneurotization to address lesions involving root avulsions... Indeed, he believed functional outcome would prove better as intraplexualneurotizations involved a greater amount of motorneurons... Narakas was the first to introduce a minimally invasive surgical concept for brachial plexus surgery... He thus developed the epidemiological rule on intraplexal lesion causes, the “7 times 70%” rule: 70% of cases involved road and street accidents, 70% of these accidents, motorcyclists were the victims, 70% of these victims presented with combined injuries, 70% of these lesions were supraclavicular, 70% of these lesions involved at least one nerve root avulsion, 70% of these avulsions involved a C7-C8-T1 level nerve root, and 70% of these avulsions developed chronic pain... EN: translation of the manuscript from French to English... All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

No MeSH data available.