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The utility of single-balloon enteroscopy for the diagnosis and management of small bowel disorders according to their clinical manifestations: a retrospective review.

Prachayakul V, Deesomsak M, Aswakul P, Leelakusolvong S - BMC Gastroenterol (2013)

Bottom Line: However, the relative clinical advantages of the 2 methods remain controversial.A total of 145 procedures were performed in 116 patients with a mean age of 58.1 ± 17.7 years (range, 18-89 years).The area of interest was achieved in 80.7% of the cases, with a 5.5% rate of technical failure.

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ABSTRACT

Background: The advent of double-balloon enteroscopy has enabled more accurate diagnosis and treatment of small bowel disorders. Single-balloon enteroscopy permits visualization of the entire small intestine less often than does double-balloon enteroscopy. However, the relative clinical advantages of the 2 methods remain controversial. This study therefore aimed to identify the indications for and therapeutic impact of performing single-balloon enteroscopy.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from adults who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy from January 2007 through November 2011 and analyzed their baseline characteristics, endoscopic findings, pathological diagnoses, and clinical outcomes.

Results: A total of 145 procedures were performed in 116 patients with a mean age of 58.1 ± 17.7 years (range, 18-89 years). The most common indications for performing single-balloon enteroscopy were overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, chronic diarrhea, and occult GI bleeding, accounting for 57.9%, 12.4%, and 9.7% of the patients, respectively. The area of interest was achieved in 80.7% of the cases, with a 5.5% rate of technical failure. An overall positive finding was detected in 65.5% of the cases, of which 33.8% were ulcers and erosions; 8.3%, masses; and 3.4%, angiodysplasia. The diagnostic yields were 42.9%, 52.4%, 78.6%, 50.0%, and 25.0% for patients with overt GI bleeding, occult GI bleeding, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and abnormal imaging results, respectively. Therapeutic procedures were performed in 11% of patients with GI bleeding and achieved a therapeutic yield of 14.6% with a minor complication rate of 11.7%.

Conclusions: Single-balloon enteroscopy was effective for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel disorders, especially in patients who presented with abdominal pain, GI bleeding, or focal abnormalities on imaging scans.

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Complications of single balloon enteroscopy.
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Figure 1: Complications of single balloon enteroscopy.

Mentions: Complications were reported in 11.7% of the cases in the present study. All were classified as minor complications, as depicted in Figure 1, and most involved only abdominal discomfort and minimal small bowel mucosal trauma, allowing the patients to be discharged on the same day. Neither perforation nor acute pancreatitis was observed in this study.


The utility of single-balloon enteroscopy for the diagnosis and management of small bowel disorders according to their clinical manifestations: a retrospective review.

Prachayakul V, Deesomsak M, Aswakul P, Leelakusolvong S - BMC Gastroenterol (2013)

Complications of single balloon enteroscopy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3716953&req=5

Figure 1: Complications of single balloon enteroscopy.
Mentions: Complications were reported in 11.7% of the cases in the present study. All were classified as minor complications, as depicted in Figure 1, and most involved only abdominal discomfort and minimal small bowel mucosal trauma, allowing the patients to be discharged on the same day. Neither perforation nor acute pancreatitis was observed in this study.

Bottom Line: However, the relative clinical advantages of the 2 methods remain controversial.A total of 145 procedures were performed in 116 patients with a mean age of 58.1 ± 17.7 years (range, 18-89 years).The area of interest was achieved in 80.7% of the cases, with a 5.5% rate of technical failure.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The advent of double-balloon enteroscopy has enabled more accurate diagnosis and treatment of small bowel disorders. Single-balloon enteroscopy permits visualization of the entire small intestine less often than does double-balloon enteroscopy. However, the relative clinical advantages of the 2 methods remain controversial. This study therefore aimed to identify the indications for and therapeutic impact of performing single-balloon enteroscopy.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from adults who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy from January 2007 through November 2011 and analyzed their baseline characteristics, endoscopic findings, pathological diagnoses, and clinical outcomes.

Results: A total of 145 procedures were performed in 116 patients with a mean age of 58.1 ± 17.7 years (range, 18-89 years). The most common indications for performing single-balloon enteroscopy were overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, chronic diarrhea, and occult GI bleeding, accounting for 57.9%, 12.4%, and 9.7% of the patients, respectively. The area of interest was achieved in 80.7% of the cases, with a 5.5% rate of technical failure. An overall positive finding was detected in 65.5% of the cases, of which 33.8% were ulcers and erosions; 8.3%, masses; and 3.4%, angiodysplasia. The diagnostic yields were 42.9%, 52.4%, 78.6%, 50.0%, and 25.0% for patients with overt GI bleeding, occult GI bleeding, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and abnormal imaging results, respectively. Therapeutic procedures were performed in 11% of patients with GI bleeding and achieved a therapeutic yield of 14.6% with a minor complication rate of 11.7%.

Conclusions: Single-balloon enteroscopy was effective for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel disorders, especially in patients who presented with abdominal pain, GI bleeding, or focal abnormalities on imaging scans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus