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Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using reducing agents obtained from natural sources (Rumex hymenosepalus extracts).

Rodríguez-León E, Iñiguez-Palomares R, Navarro RE, Herrera-Urbina R, Tánori J, Iñiguez-Palomares C, Maldonado A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

Bottom Line: We have synthesized silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate solutions using extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus, a plant widely found in a large region in North America, as reducing agent.This plant is known to be rich in antioxidant molecules which we use as reducing agents.The nanoparticle diameters are in the range of 2 to 40 nm.

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Affiliation: Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, México.

ABSTRACT
We have synthesized silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate solutions using extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus, a plant widely found in a large region in North America, as reducing agent. This plant is known to be rich in antioxidant molecules which we use as reducing agents. Silver nanoparticles grow in a single-step method, at room temperature, and with no addition of external energy. The nanoparticles have been characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, as a function of the ratio of silver ions to reducing agent molecules. The nanoparticle diameters are in the range of 2 to 40 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and fast Fourier transform analysis show that two kinds of crystal structures are obtained: face-centered cubic and hexagonal.

No MeSH data available.


TEM micrographs of the silver nanoparticles obtained for different AgNO3 concentrations. (A) 2.5 mM, (B) 5 mM, (C) 7.5 mM, and (D) 15 mM, after a reaction time of 24 h.
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Figure 3: TEM micrographs of the silver nanoparticles obtained for different AgNO3 concentrations. (A) 2.5 mM, (B) 5 mM, (C) 7.5 mM, and (D) 15 mM, after a reaction time of 24 h.

Mentions: We have characterized the silver nanoparticles with transmission electron microscopy. The size and abundance of the resulting particles depend on the AgNO3 concentration. Their diameter is in the range of 2 to 40 nm. In Figures 3 and4, we present micrographs of the obtained silver nanoparticles after 24 and 96 h of the beginning of the reaction, for the different AgNO3 concentrations. For a reacting time of 24 h (Figure 3), we can appreciate that for CAgNO3 = 2.5 mM (micrograph A), the population is composed mainly of scattered, small nanoparticles. As the CAgNO3 increases, bigger nanoparticles are observed, while the proportion of small nanoparticles decreases. This trend is somehow maintained for a reacting time of 96 h (Figure 4). From the micrographs, we can observe that a population of big nanoparticles, in coexistence with a small proportion of small particles, is clearly appreciated. Furthermore, the size of the bigger particles increases as CAgNO3 is increased, while at the same time, the proportion of small nanoparticle decreases. Note that we do not observe particle coalescence, probably due to a stabilizing effect produced by the antioxidant molecules.


Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using reducing agents obtained from natural sources (Rumex hymenosepalus extracts).

Rodríguez-León E, Iñiguez-Palomares R, Navarro RE, Herrera-Urbina R, Tánori J, Iñiguez-Palomares C, Maldonado A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

TEM micrographs of the silver nanoparticles obtained for different AgNO3 concentrations. (A) 2.5 mM, (B) 5 mM, (C) 7.5 mM, and (D) 15 mM, after a reaction time of 24 h.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3716778&req=5

Figure 3: TEM micrographs of the silver nanoparticles obtained for different AgNO3 concentrations. (A) 2.5 mM, (B) 5 mM, (C) 7.5 mM, and (D) 15 mM, after a reaction time of 24 h.
Mentions: We have characterized the silver nanoparticles with transmission electron microscopy. The size and abundance of the resulting particles depend on the AgNO3 concentration. Their diameter is in the range of 2 to 40 nm. In Figures 3 and4, we present micrographs of the obtained silver nanoparticles after 24 and 96 h of the beginning of the reaction, for the different AgNO3 concentrations. For a reacting time of 24 h (Figure 3), we can appreciate that for CAgNO3 = 2.5 mM (micrograph A), the population is composed mainly of scattered, small nanoparticles. As the CAgNO3 increases, bigger nanoparticles are observed, while the proportion of small nanoparticles decreases. This trend is somehow maintained for a reacting time of 96 h (Figure 4). From the micrographs, we can observe that a population of big nanoparticles, in coexistence with a small proportion of small particles, is clearly appreciated. Furthermore, the size of the bigger particles increases as CAgNO3 is increased, while at the same time, the proportion of small nanoparticle decreases. Note that we do not observe particle coalescence, probably due to a stabilizing effect produced by the antioxidant molecules.

Bottom Line: We have synthesized silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate solutions using extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus, a plant widely found in a large region in North America, as reducing agent.This plant is known to be rich in antioxidant molecules which we use as reducing agents.The nanoparticle diameters are in the range of 2 to 40 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, México.

ABSTRACT
We have synthesized silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate solutions using extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus, a plant widely found in a large region in North America, as reducing agent. This plant is known to be rich in antioxidant molecules which we use as reducing agents. Silver nanoparticles grow in a single-step method, at room temperature, and with no addition of external energy. The nanoparticles have been characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, as a function of the ratio of silver ions to reducing agent molecules. The nanoparticle diameters are in the range of 2 to 40 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and fast Fourier transform analysis show that two kinds of crystal structures are obtained: face-centered cubic and hexagonal.

No MeSH data available.