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Reading and visual search: a developmental study in normal children.

Seassau M, Bucci MP - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age.Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading.Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: e(ye)BRAIN, Ivry-sur-Seine, France. magali.seassau@eye-brain.com

ABSTRACT
Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behaviour during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and during visual search tasks in a large population of normal young readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system in sixty-nine children (aged 6 to 15) and in a group of 10 adults (aged 24 to 39). The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading. The new finding is that younger children show poorer coordination than adults, both while reading and while performing a visual search task. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10. This finding is most likely related to the fact that learning mechanisms responsible for saccade yoking develop during childhood until adolescence.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Saccadic disconjugacy of progressive saccades in the reading (A) and visual search tasks (C) and disconjugacy during the regressive saccades in the reading (B) and visual search tasks (D).Lines represent the corresponding regressions. Dotted lines represent the regressions for children only (from 6 to 15 years old), 2A: R2 = 0.11, p<0.006; 2B: R2 = 0.006, p = 0.53; 2C: R2 = 0.07, p<0.03; 2D: R2 = 0.007; p = 0.50.
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pone-0070261-g005: Saccadic disconjugacy of progressive saccades in the reading (A) and visual search tasks (C) and disconjugacy during the regressive saccades in the reading (B) and visual search tasks (D).Lines represent the corresponding regressions. Dotted lines represent the regressions for children only (from 6 to 15 years old), 2A: R2 = 0.11, p<0.006; 2B: R2 = 0.006, p = 0.53; 2C: R2 = 0.07, p<0.03; 2D: R2 = 0.007; p = 0.50.

Mentions: Figure 5 shows the disconjugacy observed during saccades. For both tasks we found a significant effect of age on disconjugacy in progressive saccades (R2 = 0.07, p<0.02 and R2 = 0.06 p<0.03 respectively for reading and visual search task) but not in regressive saccades (R2 = 0.0001, p = 0.98 and R2 = 0.002, p = 0.74 respectively for reading and visual search): the disconjugacy of progressive saccades decreased with age.


Reading and visual search: a developmental study in normal children.

Seassau M, Bucci MP - PLoS ONE (2013)

Saccadic disconjugacy of progressive saccades in the reading (A) and visual search tasks (C) and disconjugacy during the regressive saccades in the reading (B) and visual search tasks (D).Lines represent the corresponding regressions. Dotted lines represent the regressions for children only (from 6 to 15 years old), 2A: R2 = 0.11, p<0.006; 2B: R2 = 0.006, p = 0.53; 2C: R2 = 0.07, p<0.03; 2D: R2 = 0.007; p = 0.50.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3716768&req=5

pone-0070261-g005: Saccadic disconjugacy of progressive saccades in the reading (A) and visual search tasks (C) and disconjugacy during the regressive saccades in the reading (B) and visual search tasks (D).Lines represent the corresponding regressions. Dotted lines represent the regressions for children only (from 6 to 15 years old), 2A: R2 = 0.11, p<0.006; 2B: R2 = 0.006, p = 0.53; 2C: R2 = 0.07, p<0.03; 2D: R2 = 0.007; p = 0.50.
Mentions: Figure 5 shows the disconjugacy observed during saccades. For both tasks we found a significant effect of age on disconjugacy in progressive saccades (R2 = 0.07, p<0.02 and R2 = 0.06 p<0.03 respectively for reading and visual search task) but not in regressive saccades (R2 = 0.0001, p = 0.98 and R2 = 0.002, p = 0.74 respectively for reading and visual search): the disconjugacy of progressive saccades decreased with age.

Bottom Line: The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age.Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading.Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: e(ye)BRAIN, Ivry-sur-Seine, France. magali.seassau@eye-brain.com

ABSTRACT
Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behaviour during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and during visual search tasks in a large population of normal young readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system in sixty-nine children (aged 6 to 15) and in a group of 10 adults (aged 24 to 39). The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading. The new finding is that younger children show poorer coordination than adults, both while reading and while performing a visual search task. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10. This finding is most likely related to the fact that learning mechanisms responsible for saccade yoking develop during childhood until adolescence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus