Limits...
Assessing spatial accessibility to maternity units in Shenzhen, China.

Song P, Zhu Y, Mao X, Li Q, An L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: With the rapid development of urbanization, pregnant population is growing rapidly in Shenzhen, and it has been a difficulty to serve more and more pregnant women and reduce spatial access disparities to maternity units (MUs).The comparison between spatial accessibility to public MUs and private MUs shows statistically significant difference.For policy-making, strategy for the siting and allocation of future MUs, no matter public or private, should guarantee the greatest spatial accessibility for every pregnant woman.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child, Adolescent and Women's Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: With the rapid development of urbanization, pregnant population is growing rapidly in Shenzhen, and it has been a difficulty to serve more and more pregnant women and reduce spatial access disparities to maternity units (MUs). Understanding of the current status of accessibility to MUs is valuable for supporting the rational allocation of MUs in the future.

Methods: Based on pregnant population data and MUs data, this study uses a two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method based on Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze the current spatial accessibility to MUs, and then make a comparison between that to public MUs and private MUs.

Results: Our analysis of the accessibility to all MUs within a distance of 20 km shows that the accessibilities of the areas alongside the traditional border management line are acceptable, meanwhile highlights some critical areas, such as the west part of Nanshan district and the vast east part of Longgang district. The comparison between spatial accessibility to public MUs and private MUs shows statistically significant difference.

Discussion: Results of this study suggest a great effort should be made to improve the equity of spatial accessibility to MUs in Shenzhen. For policy-making, strategy for the siting and allocation of future MUs, no matter public or private, should guarantee the greatest spatial accessibility for every pregnant woman.

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Administrative map of Shenzhen, China.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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pone-0070227-g001: Administrative map of Shenzhen, China.

Mentions: Shenzhen is a major city in Guangdong Province of China, situated immediately north of Hong Kong (Figure 1). In 1980, Shenzhen established the first Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in China and became the first experimental city of China’s reform and “opening up”. As a pioneer of developing socialist market economy, Shenzhen SEZ could use flexible governmental measures to develop economy and get strong economic policy support from central government of China. Over the past three decades, a lot of Chinese and foreign nationals have invested enormous amounts of money to develop manufacturing and service industries in Shenzhen SEZ, such as private real estates, private hospitals, etc. In the process of this experiment, the lessons from SEZ’s experience could be used in the rest of Chinese Mainland [1], [2]. With the rapid development of urbanization, Shenzhen became the first city without rural areas in China in 2010, which makes this study to be the first typical research of spatial accessibility to health resources in pure urban ground of China. From 2000 to 2010, Shenzhen’s urban population density increased from 3,596/km2 (in 2000, total population 7,008,428) to 8,588/km2 (in 2010, total population 10,357,938) [3], [4], and Shenzhen became the most crowded area in China and fifth in the World [5]. Its health system is already over-burdened, where hospital beds number (including long-term hospital beds, maternity beds and paediatric beds, but not delivery beds) per 1,000 population (a classic indicator to indicate the availability of inpatient services in terms of resources per population and reflect the status of an area’s health system) [6], [7] has decreased from 2.38 (in 2000) to 2.20 (in 2010) [3], [4], falling below the national average (latest in 2009, 4.20 beds per 1,000 population) [7]. Under this circumstance, it is important to know the current situation of health resources allocation in Shenzhen, and make reference for future urban construction and health resource planning.


Assessing spatial accessibility to maternity units in Shenzhen, China.

Song P, Zhu Y, Mao X, Li Q, An L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Administrative map of Shenzhen, China.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3716609&req=5

pone-0070227-g001: Administrative map of Shenzhen, China.
Mentions: Shenzhen is a major city in Guangdong Province of China, situated immediately north of Hong Kong (Figure 1). In 1980, Shenzhen established the first Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in China and became the first experimental city of China’s reform and “opening up”. As a pioneer of developing socialist market economy, Shenzhen SEZ could use flexible governmental measures to develop economy and get strong economic policy support from central government of China. Over the past three decades, a lot of Chinese and foreign nationals have invested enormous amounts of money to develop manufacturing and service industries in Shenzhen SEZ, such as private real estates, private hospitals, etc. In the process of this experiment, the lessons from SEZ’s experience could be used in the rest of Chinese Mainland [1], [2]. With the rapid development of urbanization, Shenzhen became the first city without rural areas in China in 2010, which makes this study to be the first typical research of spatial accessibility to health resources in pure urban ground of China. From 2000 to 2010, Shenzhen’s urban population density increased from 3,596/km2 (in 2000, total population 7,008,428) to 8,588/km2 (in 2010, total population 10,357,938) [3], [4], and Shenzhen became the most crowded area in China and fifth in the World [5]. Its health system is already over-burdened, where hospital beds number (including long-term hospital beds, maternity beds and paediatric beds, but not delivery beds) per 1,000 population (a classic indicator to indicate the availability of inpatient services in terms of resources per population and reflect the status of an area’s health system) [6], [7] has decreased from 2.38 (in 2000) to 2.20 (in 2010) [3], [4], falling below the national average (latest in 2009, 4.20 beds per 1,000 population) [7]. Under this circumstance, it is important to know the current situation of health resources allocation in Shenzhen, and make reference for future urban construction and health resource planning.

Bottom Line: With the rapid development of urbanization, pregnant population is growing rapidly in Shenzhen, and it has been a difficulty to serve more and more pregnant women and reduce spatial access disparities to maternity units (MUs).The comparison between spatial accessibility to public MUs and private MUs shows statistically significant difference.For policy-making, strategy for the siting and allocation of future MUs, no matter public or private, should guarantee the greatest spatial accessibility for every pregnant woman.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child, Adolescent and Women's Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: With the rapid development of urbanization, pregnant population is growing rapidly in Shenzhen, and it has been a difficulty to serve more and more pregnant women and reduce spatial access disparities to maternity units (MUs). Understanding of the current status of accessibility to MUs is valuable for supporting the rational allocation of MUs in the future.

Methods: Based on pregnant population data and MUs data, this study uses a two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method based on Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze the current spatial accessibility to MUs, and then make a comparison between that to public MUs and private MUs.

Results: Our analysis of the accessibility to all MUs within a distance of 20 km shows that the accessibilities of the areas alongside the traditional border management line are acceptable, meanwhile highlights some critical areas, such as the west part of Nanshan district and the vast east part of Longgang district. The comparison between spatial accessibility to public MUs and private MUs shows statistically significant difference.

Discussion: Results of this study suggest a great effort should be made to improve the equity of spatial accessibility to MUs in Shenzhen. For policy-making, strategy for the siting and allocation of future MUs, no matter public or private, should guarantee the greatest spatial accessibility for every pregnant woman.

Show MeSH