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Cell culture and electron microscopy for identifying viruses in diseases of unknown cause.

Goldsmith CS, Ksiazek TG, Rollin PE, Comer JA, Nicholson WL, Peret TC, Erdman DD, Bellini WJ, Harcourt BH, Rota PA, Bhatnagar J, Bowen MD, Erickson BR, McMullan LK, Nichol ST, Shieh WJ, Paddock CD, Zaki SR - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

Bottom Line: This report describes several events in which virus isolation and identification by electron microscopy were critical to initial recognition of the etiologic agent, which was further analyzed by additional laboratory diagnostic assays.Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Nipah, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, West Nile, Cache Valley, and Heartland viruses.These cases illustrate the importance of the techniques of cell culture and electron microscopy in pathogen identification and recognition of emerging diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop G32, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. cgoldsmith@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
During outbreaks of infectious diseases or in cases of severely ill patients, it is imperative to identify the causative agent. This report describes several events in which virus isolation and identification by electron microscopy were critical to initial recognition of the etiologic agent, which was further analyzed by additional laboratory diagnostic assays. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Nipah, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, West Nile, Cache Valley, and Heartland viruses. These cases illustrate the importance of the techniques of cell culture and electron microscopy in pathogen identification and recognition of emerging diseases.

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A) Extracellular lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus particles (arrow) containing cellular ribosomes. B) West Nile virus particles (arrow) in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of an infected cell. Also in the cisternae are smooth membrane vesicles (arrowhead). C) High magnification of Cache Valley virus particles within a Golgi vesicle, showing small surface projections (arrow). D) Extracellular, spherical Homeland virus particles (arrow) with a slightly granular core. Scale bars = 100 nm.
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Figure 2: A) Extracellular lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus particles (arrow) containing cellular ribosomes. B) West Nile virus particles (arrow) in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of an infected cell. Also in the cisternae are smooth membrane vesicles (arrowhead). C) High magnification of Cache Valley virus particles within a Golgi vesicle, showing small surface projections (arrow). D) Extracellular, spherical Homeland virus particles (arrow) with a slightly granular core. Scale bars = 100 nm.

Mentions: Arenaviruses are mostly spherical, although there can be pleomorphic forms (Figure 2, panel A). Most notable is the inclusion of ribosomes inside the virus particles. Virions have a mean diameter of 110–130 nm but can vary in size. The virus particles bud at the cell membrane and have a dense outer envelope with small surface projections, and the appearance of the interior of the particles ranges from slightly granular to lucent.


Cell culture and electron microscopy for identifying viruses in diseases of unknown cause.

Goldsmith CS, Ksiazek TG, Rollin PE, Comer JA, Nicholson WL, Peret TC, Erdman DD, Bellini WJ, Harcourt BH, Rota PA, Bhatnagar J, Bowen MD, Erickson BR, McMullan LK, Nichol ST, Shieh WJ, Paddock CD, Zaki SR - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

A) Extracellular lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus particles (arrow) containing cellular ribosomes. B) West Nile virus particles (arrow) in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of an infected cell. Also in the cisternae are smooth membrane vesicles (arrowhead). C) High magnification of Cache Valley virus particles within a Golgi vesicle, showing small surface projections (arrow). D) Extracellular, spherical Homeland virus particles (arrow) with a slightly granular core. Scale bars = 100 nm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713842&req=5

Figure 2: A) Extracellular lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus particles (arrow) containing cellular ribosomes. B) West Nile virus particles (arrow) in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of an infected cell. Also in the cisternae are smooth membrane vesicles (arrowhead). C) High magnification of Cache Valley virus particles within a Golgi vesicle, showing small surface projections (arrow). D) Extracellular, spherical Homeland virus particles (arrow) with a slightly granular core. Scale bars = 100 nm.
Mentions: Arenaviruses are mostly spherical, although there can be pleomorphic forms (Figure 2, panel A). Most notable is the inclusion of ribosomes inside the virus particles. Virions have a mean diameter of 110–130 nm but can vary in size. The virus particles bud at the cell membrane and have a dense outer envelope with small surface projections, and the appearance of the interior of the particles ranges from slightly granular to lucent.

Bottom Line: This report describes several events in which virus isolation and identification by electron microscopy were critical to initial recognition of the etiologic agent, which was further analyzed by additional laboratory diagnostic assays.Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Nipah, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, West Nile, Cache Valley, and Heartland viruses.These cases illustrate the importance of the techniques of cell culture and electron microscopy in pathogen identification and recognition of emerging diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop G32, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. cgoldsmith@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
During outbreaks of infectious diseases or in cases of severely ill patients, it is imperative to identify the causative agent. This report describes several events in which virus isolation and identification by electron microscopy were critical to initial recognition of the etiologic agent, which was further analyzed by additional laboratory diagnostic assays. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Nipah, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, West Nile, Cache Valley, and Heartland viruses. These cases illustrate the importance of the techniques of cell culture and electron microscopy in pathogen identification and recognition of emerging diseases.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus