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A need to educate postmenopausal women of their periodontal health.

Palomo L, Chitguppi R, Buencamino MC, Santos D, Thacker H - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2013)

Bottom Line: Can dentists provide a greater service to this cohort by increasing education and information?Although 97.8% of participants reported having "healthy gums", 36.2% had severe periodontitis in at least one site.The findings suggest a need to make education a priority when treatment postmenopausal women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Postmenopausal women have shown proactive willingness to take responsibility for their changing health care needs. The example of osteoporosis is a model that when educated of their bone health status, this cohort follows through with prevention and treatment regimens. Postmenopausal status is considered to be a risk factor for periodontitis. It is known that up to 50% of periodontal disease goes undiagnosed. The goal of periodontal therapy is to prevent tooth loss.

Objective: Is there a need, then to educate and inform postmenopausal women of their periodontal status? Can dentists provide a greater service to this cohort by increasing education and information?

Materials and methods: The current study compares patient perception to actual clinical findings in 94 postmenopausal women. Patients are informed of their diagnosis, and educated about the disease, its risk factors and preventive and treatment modalities. Detailed interviews examine the patient intentions to follow up on preventive and treatment regimens suggested.

Results: Although 97.8% of participants reported having "healthy gums", 36.2% had severe periodontitis in at least one site. Interviews reveal that patients associated disease with abscess, and would be likely to follow prevetive and treatment regimens when they were informed of their diagnosis and educated on the topic.

Conclusion: The findings suggest a need to make education a priority when treatment postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical examination for attachment loss
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Figure 2: Clinical examination for attachment loss

Mentions: 97.8% of participants reported having “healthy gums”, 2.1% reported having had “history of gum disease, but currently healthy gums”, and 0% reported having gum disease [Figure 1]. Based on clinical exam findings, 36.2% had severe, 26.6% had moderate, and 34.0% had mild periodontitis in at least one site [Figure 2]. 3.2% had no sites with periodontal attachment loss. Average PS was 67.5% of sites in the mouth covered with bacterial plaque biofilm. 23.4% had at least one vertical/angular radiographic defect; 30.8% had some degree of furcation involvement. When asked about frequency of dental visits to maintain the current periodontal conditions, 86.2% reported “every 6 months”, 3.2% reported “every 3 months”, and 10.6% did not know. When asked if they “could be at risk for tooth loss”, 98.9% answered no. When asked if they were aware of any risks, or unchecked conditions which could lead to health of their gums to get worse over time, 95.7% said no. No abscess or acute conditions were noted.


A need to educate postmenopausal women of their periodontal health.

Palomo L, Chitguppi R, Buencamino MC, Santos D, Thacker H - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2013)

Clinical examination for attachment loss
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713756&req=5

Figure 2: Clinical examination for attachment loss
Mentions: 97.8% of participants reported having “healthy gums”, 2.1% reported having had “history of gum disease, but currently healthy gums”, and 0% reported having gum disease [Figure 1]. Based on clinical exam findings, 36.2% had severe, 26.6% had moderate, and 34.0% had mild periodontitis in at least one site [Figure 2]. 3.2% had no sites with periodontal attachment loss. Average PS was 67.5% of sites in the mouth covered with bacterial plaque biofilm. 23.4% had at least one vertical/angular radiographic defect; 30.8% had some degree of furcation involvement. When asked about frequency of dental visits to maintain the current periodontal conditions, 86.2% reported “every 6 months”, 3.2% reported “every 3 months”, and 10.6% did not know. When asked if they “could be at risk for tooth loss”, 98.9% answered no. When asked if they were aware of any risks, or unchecked conditions which could lead to health of their gums to get worse over time, 95.7% said no. No abscess or acute conditions were noted.

Bottom Line: Can dentists provide a greater service to this cohort by increasing education and information?Although 97.8% of participants reported having "healthy gums", 36.2% had severe periodontitis in at least one site.The findings suggest a need to make education a priority when treatment postmenopausal women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Postmenopausal women have shown proactive willingness to take responsibility for their changing health care needs. The example of osteoporosis is a model that when educated of their bone health status, this cohort follows through with prevention and treatment regimens. Postmenopausal status is considered to be a risk factor for periodontitis. It is known that up to 50% of periodontal disease goes undiagnosed. The goal of periodontal therapy is to prevent tooth loss.

Objective: Is there a need, then to educate and inform postmenopausal women of their periodontal status? Can dentists provide a greater service to this cohort by increasing education and information?

Materials and methods: The current study compares patient perception to actual clinical findings in 94 postmenopausal women. Patients are informed of their diagnosis, and educated about the disease, its risk factors and preventive and treatment modalities. Detailed interviews examine the patient intentions to follow up on preventive and treatment regimens suggested.

Results: Although 97.8% of participants reported having "healthy gums", 36.2% had severe periodontitis in at least one site. Interviews reveal that patients associated disease with abscess, and would be likely to follow prevetive and treatment regimens when they were informed of their diagnosis and educated on the topic.

Conclusion: The findings suggest a need to make education a priority when treatment postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus