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A study to evaluate mobility of teeth during menstrual cycle using Periotest.

Mishra P, Marawar PP, Byakod G, Mohitey J, Mishra SS - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2013)

Bottom Line: The results of the study were subjected to statistical analysis.The stages of menstrual cycle had no significant influence on the Periotest value.Despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during ovulation and premenstruation time points.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Bhabha Dental College, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: Over a century, an increased prevalence of gingival disease associated with increasing plasma sex steroid hormone levels has been reported. These situations present unique challenges to the oral health care professional. It is believed that hormonal fluctuations such as those associated with pregnancy, menstruation, and use of hormonal contraceptives lead to an increase in tooth mobility. However, this effect of female sex hormones on periodontal ligament and tooth supporting alveolar bone has rarely been investigated. So this study was undertaken to understand the effect on tooth mobility because of hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle.

Materials and methods: The mobility of index teeth 16, 13, 21, 23, 24, 36, 33, 41, 43, and 44 was measured with Periotest in 50 females at menstruation, ovulation, and premenstruation time points. Simplified oral hygiene index, plaque index, gingival index, and probing depth were also evaluated during the different phases of menstrual cycle for each subject participating in the study.

Statistical analysis: The results of the study were subjected to statistical analysis. Data analysis was done by applying Z test for comparing difference between two sample means.

Result: The stages of menstrual cycle had no significant influence on the Periotest value. Despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during ovulation and premenstruation time points.

Conclusion: No change in tooth mobility was seen during the phases of the menstrual cycle. However, an exaggerated gingival response was seen during ovulation and premenstruation time when the entire menstrual cycle was observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gingival condition at ovulation time point of menstrual cycle (Gingival index score = 2); (a) Lateral view and (b) frontal view
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Figure 2: Gingival condition at ovulation time point of menstrual cycle (Gingival index score = 2); (a) Lateral view and (b) frontal view

Mentions: In this study, gingival inflammation was assessed by the gingival index (GI). The findings revealed that GI scores were lower during the M phase than at OV and PM time points [Figures 2 and 3]. Our findings are similar to that reported by Macheti et al.[10] who found that despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during OV and PM time points. This difference primarily maybe attributed to the increase in serum estradiol levels that peak during OV and a second peak that occurs just before menstruation.


A study to evaluate mobility of teeth during menstrual cycle using Periotest.

Mishra P, Marawar PP, Byakod G, Mohitey J, Mishra SS - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2013)

Gingival condition at ovulation time point of menstrual cycle (Gingival index score = 2); (a) Lateral view and (b) frontal view
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713755&req=5

Figure 2: Gingival condition at ovulation time point of menstrual cycle (Gingival index score = 2); (a) Lateral view and (b) frontal view
Mentions: In this study, gingival inflammation was assessed by the gingival index (GI). The findings revealed that GI scores were lower during the M phase than at OV and PM time points [Figures 2 and 3]. Our findings are similar to that reported by Macheti et al.[10] who found that despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during OV and PM time points. This difference primarily maybe attributed to the increase in serum estradiol levels that peak during OV and a second peak that occurs just before menstruation.

Bottom Line: The results of the study were subjected to statistical analysis.The stages of menstrual cycle had no significant influence on the Periotest value.Despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during ovulation and premenstruation time points.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Bhabha Dental College, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: Over a century, an increased prevalence of gingival disease associated with increasing plasma sex steroid hormone levels has been reported. These situations present unique challenges to the oral health care professional. It is believed that hormonal fluctuations such as those associated with pregnancy, menstruation, and use of hormonal contraceptives lead to an increase in tooth mobility. However, this effect of female sex hormones on periodontal ligament and tooth supporting alveolar bone has rarely been investigated. So this study was undertaken to understand the effect on tooth mobility because of hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle.

Materials and methods: The mobility of index teeth 16, 13, 21, 23, 24, 36, 33, 41, 43, and 44 was measured with Periotest in 50 females at menstruation, ovulation, and premenstruation time points. Simplified oral hygiene index, plaque index, gingival index, and probing depth were also evaluated during the different phases of menstrual cycle for each subject participating in the study.

Statistical analysis: The results of the study were subjected to statistical analysis. Data analysis was done by applying Z test for comparing difference between two sample means.

Result: The stages of menstrual cycle had no significant influence on the Periotest value. Despite no significant change in plaque levels, GI was significantly higher during ovulation and premenstruation time points.

Conclusion: No change in tooth mobility was seen during the phases of the menstrual cycle. However, an exaggerated gingival response was seen during ovulation and premenstruation time when the entire menstrual cycle was observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus