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Rural perspective about anesthesia and anesthesiologist: A cross-sectional study.

Singh P, Kumar A, Trikha A - J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol (2013)

Bottom Line: The patients on the basis of their answers were classified as "aware or unaware", also source of patient information was analyzed.Even with an extremely low threshold, only 36.44% of population could be classified as aware, and commonest source of their information was not anesthesiologist but surgeon (64.32%). 83.6% patients were not aware of contents of pre-operative consent they had signed and further, only 3.4% were aware of anesthesia-related issues.Both patient and anesthesiologist must understand the importance of consent, as it is not only a legal binding but can eliminate pre-operative factitious fears of patients and can improve patient satisfaction towards surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 3/4(th) of Indian population resides in rural areas. The public awareness towards "Anesthesia and Anesthesiologist" is limited even in urban population. There is no data available from rural India on this perspective. Our cross-sectional analysis highlights this lack of public awareness and discusses possible remedies to overcome these limitations.

Materials and methods: Surgical outpatient department of Comprehensive Rural Health Center (CRHC) Ballabgarh, Haryana (model CRHC for Indian health schemes) was screened for 6 months period. A questionnaire divided into 3 parts (Awareness about Anesthesiologist, Consent, Present surgical experience) was filled out for each patient. The patients on the basis of their answers were classified as "aware or unaware", also source of patient information was analyzed.

Results: Even with an extremely low threshold, only 36.44% of population could be classified as aware, and commonest source of their information was not anesthesiologist but surgeon (64.32%). 83.6% patients were not aware of contents of pre-operative consent they had signed and further, only 3.4% were aware of anesthesia-related issues. Pain was reported as the most common pre-operative fear and post-operative patient concern. 47.17% patients due to lack of pre-operative counseling were not able to recognize the type of anesthesia and thought they had received both general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia. At the end, after explaining the role of anesthesia for surgery, 99.06% patients presented desire to meet the anesthesiologist beforehand if they were to be operated in future.

Conclusion: The rural awareness about anesthesia is extremely low likely because of low literacy rates and lack of pre-operative counseling by anesthesiologist. Both patient and anesthesiologist must understand the importance of consent, as it is not only a legal binding but can eliminate pre-operative factitious fears of patients and can improve patient satisfaction towards surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pre-operative fears reported by patients
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Figure 2: Pre-operative fears reported by patients

Mentions: Among the procedures performed, 76.4% were performed under SAB and the rest under GA. The post-surgical questionnaire evaluated patient’s common apprehensions towards surgery and their actual anesthesia experience. On asking about any worries related to surgery, 92.3% patients said that they completely trusted the doctor and thus are not worried at all. However, on asking to provide single most possible concern that they are likely to face during surgery was pain in 46.95%, whereas 23% were scared of needle prick during surgery. 10.33% expressed fear of not regaining full consciousness after anesthesia, rest 19.72% were worried of variable complaints like prolonged hospital stay, increased cost of total surgery because of anesthesia drugs and ineffective drug leading to incomplete anesthesia (awareness). Post-surgical possible problems reported by patients were untreatable pain (86.38%), patients who were explained to be given GA were apprehensive about possibility about not waking up well after anesthesia or continued residual effect of anesthesia (7.98%), 5.16% patients when explained risks of GA were scared of possibility of PONV over other concerns. 0.47% patients did not express any answer and neither acknowledged any practical possibility of post-operative fear [Figure 2].


Rural perspective about anesthesia and anesthesiologist: A cross-sectional study.

Singh P, Kumar A, Trikha A - J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol (2013)

Pre-operative fears reported by patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713673&req=5

Figure 2: Pre-operative fears reported by patients
Mentions: Among the procedures performed, 76.4% were performed under SAB and the rest under GA. The post-surgical questionnaire evaluated patient’s common apprehensions towards surgery and their actual anesthesia experience. On asking about any worries related to surgery, 92.3% patients said that they completely trusted the doctor and thus are not worried at all. However, on asking to provide single most possible concern that they are likely to face during surgery was pain in 46.95%, whereas 23% were scared of needle prick during surgery. 10.33% expressed fear of not regaining full consciousness after anesthesia, rest 19.72% were worried of variable complaints like prolonged hospital stay, increased cost of total surgery because of anesthesia drugs and ineffective drug leading to incomplete anesthesia (awareness). Post-surgical possible problems reported by patients were untreatable pain (86.38%), patients who were explained to be given GA were apprehensive about possibility about not waking up well after anesthesia or continued residual effect of anesthesia (7.98%), 5.16% patients when explained risks of GA were scared of possibility of PONV over other concerns. 0.47% patients did not express any answer and neither acknowledged any practical possibility of post-operative fear [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: The patients on the basis of their answers were classified as "aware or unaware", also source of patient information was analyzed.Even with an extremely low threshold, only 36.44% of population could be classified as aware, and commonest source of their information was not anesthesiologist but surgeon (64.32%). 83.6% patients were not aware of contents of pre-operative consent they had signed and further, only 3.4% were aware of anesthesia-related issues.Both patient and anesthesiologist must understand the importance of consent, as it is not only a legal binding but can eliminate pre-operative factitious fears of patients and can improve patient satisfaction towards surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 3/4(th) of Indian population resides in rural areas. The public awareness towards "Anesthesia and Anesthesiologist" is limited even in urban population. There is no data available from rural India on this perspective. Our cross-sectional analysis highlights this lack of public awareness and discusses possible remedies to overcome these limitations.

Materials and methods: Surgical outpatient department of Comprehensive Rural Health Center (CRHC) Ballabgarh, Haryana (model CRHC for Indian health schemes) was screened for 6 months period. A questionnaire divided into 3 parts (Awareness about Anesthesiologist, Consent, Present surgical experience) was filled out for each patient. The patients on the basis of their answers were classified as "aware or unaware", also source of patient information was analyzed.

Results: Even with an extremely low threshold, only 36.44% of population could be classified as aware, and commonest source of their information was not anesthesiologist but surgeon (64.32%). 83.6% patients were not aware of contents of pre-operative consent they had signed and further, only 3.4% were aware of anesthesia-related issues. Pain was reported as the most common pre-operative fear and post-operative patient concern. 47.17% patients due to lack of pre-operative counseling were not able to recognize the type of anesthesia and thought they had received both general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia. At the end, after explaining the role of anesthesia for surgery, 99.06% patients presented desire to meet the anesthesiologist beforehand if they were to be operated in future.

Conclusion: The rural awareness about anesthesia is extremely low likely because of low literacy rates and lack of pre-operative counseling by anesthesiologist. Both patient and anesthesiologist must understand the importance of consent, as it is not only a legal binding but can eliminate pre-operative factitious fears of patients and can improve patient satisfaction towards surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus