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Firstborn offspring sex ratio is skewed towards female offspring in anesthesia care providers: A questionnaire-based nationwide study from United States.

Gupta D, Kaminski E, McKelvey G, Wang H - J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol (2013)

Bottom Line: A parental occupation such as anesthesia care provider can involve exposure of the parent to various chemicals in the work environment and has been correlated to skewed offspring sex ratios.The current US national total-population sex ratio is 0.97 male (s)/female with an at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female; comparatively, the results from anesthesia providers' survey respondents (n = 314) were a total OSR of 0.93 male (s)/female (P = 0.61) with firstborn OSR 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; P = 0.03), respectively.Based on the results of this limited survey, it can be concluded that anesthesia care providers who practice inhalation induction of anesthesia during the peri-conceptional period are significantly more likely to have firstborn female offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: A parental occupation such as anesthesia care provider can involve exposure of the parent to various chemicals in the work environment and has been correlated to skewed offspring sex ratios.

Objectives: The objective was to conduct a nation-wide survey to observe (a) whether firstborn offspring sex ratio (OSR) in anesthesia providers is skewed towards increased female offspring, and (b) to identify potential factors influencing firstborn OSR, particularly those relating to the peri-conceptional practice of inhalational anesthesia induction among anesthesia providers.

Materials and methods: After institutional review board approval, a questionnaire was uploaded on SurveyMonkey and sent to anesthesia providers through their program coordinators in United States (US) to complete the survey.

Results: The current US national total-population sex ratio is 0.97 male (s)/female with an at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female; comparatively, the results from anesthesia providers' survey respondents (n = 314) were a total OSR of 0.93 male (s)/female (P = 0.61) with firstborn OSR 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; P = 0.03), respectively. The only significant peri-conceptional factor related to anesthesia providers' firstborn OSR's skew was inhalational induction practice by anesthesia care provider favoring female offspring (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: Based on the results of this limited survey, it can be concluded that anesthesia care providers who practice inhalation induction of anesthesia during the peri-conceptional period are significantly more likely to have firstborn female offspring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of respondents to deduce the final eligible respondents for comparative analysis
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Figure 2: Distribution of respondents to deduce the final eligible respondents for comparative analysis

Mentions: The response rate to the survey provided a total of 443 respondents [Figure 1], of which 314 respondents were found to be eligible for survey analysis [Figure 2]. The data results from eligible responses’ analysis showed that compared to the US total-population sex ratio of 0.97 male (s)/female,[910] the total OSR for survey respondents was 0.93 male (s)/female (power 1-β > 0.99; P = 0.61). As compared to US at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female,[11] firstborn OSR from the survey was 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; power 1-β = 0.61; P = 0.03). The abovementioned survey data-derived OSRs were statistically compared to general population data based on the statistical methods as applied by Wyatt and Wilson.[5]


Firstborn offspring sex ratio is skewed towards female offspring in anesthesia care providers: A questionnaire-based nationwide study from United States.

Gupta D, Kaminski E, McKelvey G, Wang H - J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol (2013)

Distribution of respondents to deduce the final eligible respondents for comparative analysis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713672&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of respondents to deduce the final eligible respondents for comparative analysis
Mentions: The response rate to the survey provided a total of 443 respondents [Figure 1], of which 314 respondents were found to be eligible for survey analysis [Figure 2]. The data results from eligible responses’ analysis showed that compared to the US total-population sex ratio of 0.97 male (s)/female,[910] the total OSR for survey respondents was 0.93 male (s)/female (power 1-β > 0.99; P = 0.61). As compared to US at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female,[11] firstborn OSR from the survey was 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; power 1-β = 0.61; P = 0.03). The abovementioned survey data-derived OSRs were statistically compared to general population data based on the statistical methods as applied by Wyatt and Wilson.[5]

Bottom Line: A parental occupation such as anesthesia care provider can involve exposure of the parent to various chemicals in the work environment and has been correlated to skewed offspring sex ratios.The current US national total-population sex ratio is 0.97 male (s)/female with an at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female; comparatively, the results from anesthesia providers' survey respondents (n = 314) were a total OSR of 0.93 male (s)/female (P = 0.61) with firstborn OSR 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; P = 0.03), respectively.Based on the results of this limited survey, it can be concluded that anesthesia care providers who practice inhalation induction of anesthesia during the peri-conceptional period are significantly more likely to have firstborn female offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: A parental occupation such as anesthesia care provider can involve exposure of the parent to various chemicals in the work environment and has been correlated to skewed offspring sex ratios.

Objectives: The objective was to conduct a nation-wide survey to observe (a) whether firstborn offspring sex ratio (OSR) in anesthesia providers is skewed towards increased female offspring, and (b) to identify potential factors influencing firstborn OSR, particularly those relating to the peri-conceptional practice of inhalational anesthesia induction among anesthesia providers.

Materials and methods: After institutional review board approval, a questionnaire was uploaded on SurveyMonkey and sent to anesthesia providers through their program coordinators in United States (US) to complete the survey.

Results: The current US national total-population sex ratio is 0.97 male (s)/female with an at-birth sex ratio of 1.05 male (s)/female; comparatively, the results from anesthesia providers' survey respondents (n = 314) were a total OSR of 0.93 male (s)/female (P = 0.61) with firstborn OSR 0.82 male (s)/female (a 6% increase in female offspring; P = 0.03), respectively. The only significant peri-conceptional factor related to anesthesia providers' firstborn OSR's skew was inhalational induction practice by anesthesia care provider favoring female offspring (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: Based on the results of this limited survey, it can be concluded that anesthesia care providers who practice inhalation induction of anesthesia during the peri-conceptional period are significantly more likely to have firstborn female offspring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus