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Fluoxetine treatment promotes functional recovery in a rat model of cervical spinal cord injury.

Scali M, Begenisic T, Mainardi M, Milanese M, Bonifacino T, Bonanno G, Sale A, Maffei L - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: We show that fluoxetine administration markedly improved motor functions compared to controls in several behavioral paradigms.The improved functional effects correlated positively with significant sprouting of intact corticospinal fibers and a modulation of the excitation/inhibition balance.Our results suggest a potential application of fluoxetine treatment as a non invasive therapeutic strategy for SCI-associated neuropathologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience CNR, Pisa, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe condition leading to enduring motor deficits. When lesions are incomplete, promoting spinal cord plasticity might be a useful strategy to elicit functional recovery. Here we investigated whether long-term fluoxetine administration in the drinking water, a treatment recently demonstrated to optimize brain plasticity in several pathological conditions, promotes motor recovery in rats that received a C4 dorsal funiculus crush. We show that fluoxetine administration markedly improved motor functions compared to controls in several behavioral paradigms. The improved functional effects correlated positively with significant sprouting of intact corticospinal fibers and a modulation of the excitation/inhibition balance. Our results suggest a potential application of fluoxetine treatment as a non invasive therapeutic strategy for SCI-associated neuropathologies.

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Faster recovery of gait coordination in FLX rats.(a) Typical footprints of animal walking 2 weeks after SCI. Gray: forepaw footprints; Black: hindpaw footprints (b) Gait analysis. After SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of coordination compared to CTR-inj at the 3rd and 5th testing week. The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period. Error bars represent SEM. Symbols indicate statistical difference.
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f2: Faster recovery of gait coordination in FLX rats.(a) Typical footprints of animal walking 2 weeks after SCI. Gray: forepaw footprints; Black: hindpaw footprints (b) Gait analysis. After SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of coordination compared to CTR-inj at the 3rd and 5th testing week. The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period. Error bars represent SEM. Symbols indicate statistical difference.

Mentions: We also assessed walking patterns with the footprint analysis of gait1516 (Fig. 2a, b), during which the rat forepaws and hindpaws were stained with different ink colors and the animals were allowed to walk freely over a paper strip. As a sensitive index of walking coordination, we calculated the mean distance between forepaw and hindpaw tracks over at least five consecutive steps. While both injured groups exhibited a reduced coordination in forepaw-hindpaw stepping after SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of gait coordination compared to CTR-inj animals three weeks after SCI (Two Way Repeated ANOVA, post hoc Holm-Sidak method, p < 0.001). The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period (One-Way RM ANOVA, p = 0.477).


Fluoxetine treatment promotes functional recovery in a rat model of cervical spinal cord injury.

Scali M, Begenisic T, Mainardi M, Milanese M, Bonifacino T, Bonanno G, Sale A, Maffei L - Sci Rep (2013)

Faster recovery of gait coordination in FLX rats.(a) Typical footprints of animal walking 2 weeks after SCI. Gray: forepaw footprints; Black: hindpaw footprints (b) Gait analysis. After SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of coordination compared to CTR-inj at the 3rd and 5th testing week. The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period. Error bars represent SEM. Symbols indicate statistical difference.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713566&req=5

f2: Faster recovery of gait coordination in FLX rats.(a) Typical footprints of animal walking 2 weeks after SCI. Gray: forepaw footprints; Black: hindpaw footprints (b) Gait analysis. After SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of coordination compared to CTR-inj at the 3rd and 5th testing week. The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period. Error bars represent SEM. Symbols indicate statistical difference.
Mentions: We also assessed walking patterns with the footprint analysis of gait1516 (Fig. 2a, b), during which the rat forepaws and hindpaws were stained with different ink colors and the animals were allowed to walk freely over a paper strip. As a sensitive index of walking coordination, we calculated the mean distance between forepaw and hindpaw tracks over at least five consecutive steps. While both injured groups exhibited a reduced coordination in forepaw-hindpaw stepping after SCI, FLX rats showed a marked recovery of gait coordination compared to CTR-inj animals three weeks after SCI (Two Way Repeated ANOVA, post hoc Holm-Sidak method, p < 0.001). The performance of CTR-sham rats did not change throughout the testing period (One-Way RM ANOVA, p = 0.477).

Bottom Line: We show that fluoxetine administration markedly improved motor functions compared to controls in several behavioral paradigms.The improved functional effects correlated positively with significant sprouting of intact corticospinal fibers and a modulation of the excitation/inhibition balance.Our results suggest a potential application of fluoxetine treatment as a non invasive therapeutic strategy for SCI-associated neuropathologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience CNR, Pisa, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe condition leading to enduring motor deficits. When lesions are incomplete, promoting spinal cord plasticity might be a useful strategy to elicit functional recovery. Here we investigated whether long-term fluoxetine administration in the drinking water, a treatment recently demonstrated to optimize brain plasticity in several pathological conditions, promotes motor recovery in rats that received a C4 dorsal funiculus crush. We show that fluoxetine administration markedly improved motor functions compared to controls in several behavioral paradigms. The improved functional effects correlated positively with significant sprouting of intact corticospinal fibers and a modulation of the excitation/inhibition balance. Our results suggest a potential application of fluoxetine treatment as a non invasive therapeutic strategy for SCI-associated neuropathologies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus