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Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics.

Parkes DE, Shelford LR, Wadley P, Holý V, Wang M, Hindmarch AT, van der Laan G, Campion RP, Edmonds KW, Cavill SA, Rushforth AW - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies.Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths.Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ferromagnetic resonance.(a) Frequency vs magnetic field map of absorbed microwave power (VNA S12) for the magnetic field applied along the [100] easy axis. The Kittel resonance can be clearly identified. The red line represents the theoretical curve. (b) The microwave transmission vs magnetic field measured from a line scan through (a) at a frequency of 15 GHz. The data (red dots) are fitted to an asymmetric peak function (blue line) allowing the linewidth, defined as the half width at half maximum, to be extracted. Inset shows the resonant frequency as a function of applied strain for μ0H = 20 mT applied along the [010] direction.
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f3: Ferromagnetic resonance.(a) Frequency vs magnetic field map of absorbed microwave power (VNA S12) for the magnetic field applied along the [100] easy axis. The Kittel resonance can be clearly identified. The red line represents the theoretical curve. (b) The microwave transmission vs magnetic field measured from a line scan through (a) at a frequency of 15 GHz. The data (red dots) are fitted to an asymmetric peak function (blue line) allowing the linewidth, defined as the half width at half maximum, to be extracted. Inset shows the resonant frequency as a function of applied strain for μ0H = 20 mT applied along the [010] direction.

Mentions: In order to measure the anisotropic FMR we utilized vector network analysis in combination with an octupole electromagnet capable of applying a field at any point in a sphere of 0.5T radius. Figure 3(a) shows a 2D resonance map obtained by measuring the s-wave parameter, S12 which is related to the microwave transmission, as a function of frequency and applied field.


Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics.

Parkes DE, Shelford LR, Wadley P, Holý V, Wang M, Hindmarch AT, van der Laan G, Campion RP, Edmonds KW, Cavill SA, Rushforth AW - Sci Rep (2013)

Ferromagnetic resonance.(a) Frequency vs magnetic field map of absorbed microwave power (VNA S12) for the magnetic field applied along the [100] easy axis. The Kittel resonance can be clearly identified. The red line represents the theoretical curve. (b) The microwave transmission vs magnetic field measured from a line scan through (a) at a frequency of 15 GHz. The data (red dots) are fitted to an asymmetric peak function (blue line) allowing the linewidth, defined as the half width at half maximum, to be extracted. Inset shows the resonant frequency as a function of applied strain for μ0H = 20 mT applied along the [010] direction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713564&req=5

f3: Ferromagnetic resonance.(a) Frequency vs magnetic field map of absorbed microwave power (VNA S12) for the magnetic field applied along the [100] easy axis. The Kittel resonance can be clearly identified. The red line represents the theoretical curve. (b) The microwave transmission vs magnetic field measured from a line scan through (a) at a frequency of 15 GHz. The data (red dots) are fitted to an asymmetric peak function (blue line) allowing the linewidth, defined as the half width at half maximum, to be extracted. Inset shows the resonant frequency as a function of applied strain for μ0H = 20 mT applied along the [010] direction.
Mentions: In order to measure the anisotropic FMR we utilized vector network analysis in combination with an octupole electromagnet capable of applying a field at any point in a sphere of 0.5T radius. Figure 3(a) shows a 2D resonance map obtained by measuring the s-wave parameter, S12 which is related to the microwave transmission, as a function of frequency and applied field.

Bottom Line: Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies.Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths.Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus