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A case of orbital emphysema associated with frontal sinus pneumocele.

Sasaki T, Yamoto T, Fujita K, Nakao N - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged associated with a partial defect of the orbital roof, allowing air entry into the orbit.We performed frontal craniotomy and removed the mucocele and the inner table of frontal bone to communicate the frontal sinus with the nasal cavity.After operation, her exophthalmos was improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Orbital emphysema is usually caused by trauma and fracture of an orbital bone, allowing air to pass from the sinuses into the orbit. Orbital emphysema without any significant trauma is rare. We present a case of a 67-year-old-woman who complained of left exophthalmos without any history of trauma, sneezing, or sinus surgery. Computed tomography scanning showed left orbital emphysema protruding the eyeball forward. The left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged associated with a partial defect of the orbital roof, allowing air entry into the orbit. In addition, the frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served as a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses. We performed frontal craniotomy and removed the mucocele and the inner table of frontal bone to communicate the frontal sinus with the nasal cavity. After operation, her exophthalmos was improved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Left exophthalmos, 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry. Axial imaging of computed tomography (B, C) showing left frontal sinus pneumocele and orbital emphysema protruding the eye ball forward. Coronal imaging (D) showing that the left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged and the orbital roof was partially absent. The frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses.
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FI130005-1: (A) Left exophthalmos, 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry. Axial imaging of computed tomography (B, C) showing left frontal sinus pneumocele and orbital emphysema protruding the eye ball forward. Coronal imaging (D) showing that the left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged and the orbital roof was partially absent. The frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses.

Mentions: A 67-year-old-woman was admitted to our department complaining of left exophthalmos that had been present and started slowly worsening 1 month ago (Fig. 1A). There was no history of trauma, sinus disease, sneezing, or sinus surgery. She had no pain, visual disturbance, or double vision. On examination, the visual acuity was 20/25 on the right and 20/16 on the left. The ocular movement was intact. The extent of forward displacement of the eyeball was 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry.


A case of orbital emphysema associated with frontal sinus pneumocele.

Sasaki T, Yamoto T, Fujita K, Nakao N - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

(A) Left exophthalmos, 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry. Axial imaging of computed tomography (B, C) showing left frontal sinus pneumocele and orbital emphysema protruding the eye ball forward. Coronal imaging (D) showing that the left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged and the orbital roof was partially absent. The frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713563&req=5

FI130005-1: (A) Left exophthalmos, 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry. Axial imaging of computed tomography (B, C) showing left frontal sinus pneumocele and orbital emphysema protruding the eye ball forward. Coronal imaging (D) showing that the left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged and the orbital roof was partially absent. The frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses.
Mentions: A 67-year-old-woman was admitted to our department complaining of left exophthalmos that had been present and started slowly worsening 1 month ago (Fig. 1A). There was no history of trauma, sinus disease, sneezing, or sinus surgery. She had no pain, visual disturbance, or double vision. On examination, the visual acuity was 20/25 on the right and 20/16 on the left. The ocular movement was intact. The extent of forward displacement of the eyeball was 15 mm on the right and 22 mm on the left by Hertel exophthalmometry.

Bottom Line: The left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged associated with a partial defect of the orbital roof, allowing air entry into the orbit.We performed frontal craniotomy and removed the mucocele and the inner table of frontal bone to communicate the frontal sinus with the nasal cavity.After operation, her exophthalmos was improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Orbital emphysema is usually caused by trauma and fracture of an orbital bone, allowing air to pass from the sinuses into the orbit. Orbital emphysema without any significant trauma is rare. We present a case of a 67-year-old-woman who complained of left exophthalmos without any history of trauma, sneezing, or sinus surgery. Computed tomography scanning showed left orbital emphysema protruding the eyeball forward. The left frontal sinus was remarkably enlarged associated with a partial defect of the orbital roof, allowing air entry into the orbit. In addition, the frontal sinus ostium was occluded with the mucocele that served as a one-way valve between the frontal and the ethmoidal sinuses. We performed frontal craniotomy and removed the mucocele and the inner table of frontal bone to communicate the frontal sinus with the nasal cavity. After operation, her exophthalmos was improved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus