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Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the clivus: case report and review of the literature.

Gologorsky Y, Shrivastava RK, Panov F, Mascitelli J, Signore AD, Govindaraj S, Smethurst M, Bronster DJ - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms.When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas.Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary intraosseous hemangiomas are benign, vascular malformations that account for approximately 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms. When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas. Because of this, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported. We report a patient case with review of recent pertinent literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoperative stereotactic snapshot image correlating intraoperative pathology with sagittal computed tomography scan.
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FI120066-4: Intraoperative stereotactic snapshot image correlating intraoperative pathology with sagittal computed tomography scan.

Mentions: Based on the patient's cranial neuropathies and evolving presentation, the decision was made at interdisciplinary tumor board to proceed with an endoscopic endonasal clival biopsy and partial tissue debulking. The patient was taken to the operating room for endoscopic transnasal biopsy of the clival lesion. To aid with intraoperative localization of the lesion, stereotactic, frameless, computer-assisted surgical navigation was utilized (Fig. 4). Epinephrine-soaked pledgets were utilized to decongest the nasal cavity and allow for adequate vasoconstriction. Preoperative cefuroxime and 10 mg of dexamethasone were administered. A zero-degree endoscope was employed to survey the bilateral nasal cavity and used for the remainder of the case. A mucoperiosteal flap was developed bilaterally using a long needle-tipped cautery spanning the face of the sphenoid and taken onto the posterior septum, which was subsequently reflected inferiorly.


Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the clivus: case report and review of the literature.

Gologorsky Y, Shrivastava RK, Panov F, Mascitelli J, Signore AD, Govindaraj S, Smethurst M, Bronster DJ - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Intraoperative stereotactic snapshot image correlating intraoperative pathology with sagittal computed tomography scan.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713557&req=5

FI120066-4: Intraoperative stereotactic snapshot image correlating intraoperative pathology with sagittal computed tomography scan.
Mentions: Based on the patient's cranial neuropathies and evolving presentation, the decision was made at interdisciplinary tumor board to proceed with an endoscopic endonasal clival biopsy and partial tissue debulking. The patient was taken to the operating room for endoscopic transnasal biopsy of the clival lesion. To aid with intraoperative localization of the lesion, stereotactic, frameless, computer-assisted surgical navigation was utilized (Fig. 4). Epinephrine-soaked pledgets were utilized to decongest the nasal cavity and allow for adequate vasoconstriction. Preoperative cefuroxime and 10 mg of dexamethasone were administered. A zero-degree endoscope was employed to survey the bilateral nasal cavity and used for the remainder of the case. A mucoperiosteal flap was developed bilaterally using a long needle-tipped cautery spanning the face of the sphenoid and taken onto the posterior septum, which was subsequently reflected inferiorly.

Bottom Line: These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms.When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas.Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary intraosseous hemangiomas are benign, vascular malformations that account for approximately 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms. When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas. Because of this, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported. We report a patient case with review of recent pertinent literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus