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Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the clivus: case report and review of the literature.

Gologorsky Y, Shrivastava RK, Panov F, Mascitelli J, Signore AD, Govindaraj S, Smethurst M, Bronster DJ - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms.When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas.Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary intraosseous hemangiomas are benign, vascular malformations that account for approximately 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms. When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas. Because of this, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported. We report a patient case with review of recent pertinent literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sagittal computed tomography reformatted image demonstrating an erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserves the cortical margin.
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FI120066-2: Sagittal computed tomography reformatted image demonstrating an erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserves the cortical margin.

Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging demonstrated two separate abnormalities: A 3.4 cm × 2.3 cm hypodense soft tissue fullness at the anterior craniocervical junction with erosion of the inferior aspect of the clivus (Fig. 1) and a 2.0 cm × 1.9 cm erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserved the cortical margin (Fig. 2). The former lesion was characteristic for rheumatoid pannus, but the latter lesion was concerning for tumor. A subsequent CT of the chest/abdomen/pelvis was notable for a 2-cm mass of the right kidney suspicious for renal cell carcinoma. A conventional cerebral angiogram was obtained to determine the vascularity of this lesion, given the metastatic renal cell carcinoma concern. This angiogram, however, did not demonstrate any evidence of vascular lesions within the clivus (Fig. 3).


Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the clivus: case report and review of the literature.

Gologorsky Y, Shrivastava RK, Panov F, Mascitelli J, Signore AD, Govindaraj S, Smethurst M, Bronster DJ - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Sagittal computed tomography reformatted image demonstrating an erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserves the cortical margin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713557&req=5

FI120066-2: Sagittal computed tomography reformatted image demonstrating an erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserves the cortical margin.
Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging demonstrated two separate abnormalities: A 3.4 cm × 2.3 cm hypodense soft tissue fullness at the anterior craniocervical junction with erosion of the inferior aspect of the clivus (Fig. 1) and a 2.0 cm × 1.9 cm erosive mass of the upper clivus that preserved the cortical margin (Fig. 2). The former lesion was characteristic for rheumatoid pannus, but the latter lesion was concerning for tumor. A subsequent CT of the chest/abdomen/pelvis was notable for a 2-cm mass of the right kidney suspicious for renal cell carcinoma. A conventional cerebral angiogram was obtained to determine the vascularity of this lesion, given the metastatic renal cell carcinoma concern. This angiogram, however, did not demonstrate any evidence of vascular lesions within the clivus (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms.When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas.Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary intraosseous hemangiomas are benign, vascular malformations that account for approximately 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies and are rarely seen in the calvarium, where they represent 0.2% of bony neoplasms. When found in the skull, they tend to present with vague symptoms and do not have the typical radiological findings suggestive of hemangiomas. Because of this, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. Involvement of the skull base is exceedingly rare, and presentation with cranial nerve unilateral polyneuropathies has not been reported. We report a patient case with review of recent pertinent literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus