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Vascular leiomyoma and geniculate ganglion.

Magliulo G, Iannella G, Valente M, Greco A, Ciniglio Appiani M - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Results Removal of the entire lesion was achieved, preserving the anatomic integrity of the nerve; no nerve graft was necessary.Postoperative histology and immunohistochemical studies revealed features indicative of solid vascular leiomyoma.Optimal postoperative facial function is possible only by preserving the anatomical and functional integrity of the facial nerve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Organi di Senso Department University "la Sapienza," Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Objectives Discussion of a rare case of angioleiomyoma involving the geniculate ganglion and the intratemporal facial nerve segment and its surgical treatment. Design Case report. Setting Presence of an expansive lesion englobing the geniculate ganglion without any lesion to the cerebellopontine angle. Participants A 45-year-old man with a grade III facial paralysis according to the House-Brackmann scale of evaluation. Main Outcomes Measure Surgical pathology, radiologic appearance, histological features, and postoperative facial function. Results Removal of the entire lesion was achieved, preserving the anatomic integrity of the nerve; no nerve graft was necessary. Postoperative histology and immunohistochemical studies revealed features indicative of solid vascular leiomyoma. Conclusion Angioleiomyoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of geniculate ganglion lesions. Optimal postoperative facial function is possible only by preserving the anatomical and functional integrity of the facial nerve.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy, tumor arising from the geniculate ganglion and the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve (arrowheads).
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FI120059-2: Intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy, tumor arising from the geniculate ganglion and the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve (arrowheads).

Mentions: We planned an intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy (ICWT) with eventual facial nerve grafting. Intraoperatively, we observed a dark red mass encasing the geniculate ganglion (Fig. 2). We were able to remove the entire lesion, identifying a cleavage plane with the geniculate ganglion and, thus, preserving the anatomical integrity of the nerve (Fig. 3). The incus was removed during surgery. The ossiculoplasty was immediately performed modeling the incus. Postoperatively, the patient had a mild conductive hearing loss (PTA 25).


Vascular leiomyoma and geniculate ganglion.

Magliulo G, Iannella G, Valente M, Greco A, Ciniglio Appiani M - J Neurol Surg Rep (2013)

Intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy, tumor arising from the geniculate ganglion and the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve (arrowheads).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713553&req=5

FI120059-2: Intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy, tumor arising from the geniculate ganglion and the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve (arrowheads).
Mentions: We planned an intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy (ICWT) with eventual facial nerve grafting. Intraoperatively, we observed a dark red mass encasing the geniculate ganglion (Fig. 2). We were able to remove the entire lesion, identifying a cleavage plane with the geniculate ganglion and, thus, preserving the anatomical integrity of the nerve (Fig. 3). The incus was removed during surgery. The ossiculoplasty was immediately performed modeling the incus. Postoperatively, the patient had a mild conductive hearing loss (PTA 25).

Bottom Line: Results Removal of the entire lesion was achieved, preserving the anatomic integrity of the nerve; no nerve graft was necessary.Postoperative histology and immunohistochemical studies revealed features indicative of solid vascular leiomyoma.Optimal postoperative facial function is possible only by preserving the anatomical and functional integrity of the facial nerve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Organi di Senso Department University "la Sapienza," Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Objectives Discussion of a rare case of angioleiomyoma involving the geniculate ganglion and the intratemporal facial nerve segment and its surgical treatment. Design Case report. Setting Presence of an expansive lesion englobing the geniculate ganglion without any lesion to the cerebellopontine angle. Participants A 45-year-old man with a grade III facial paralysis according to the House-Brackmann scale of evaluation. Main Outcomes Measure Surgical pathology, radiologic appearance, histological features, and postoperative facial function. Results Removal of the entire lesion was achieved, preserving the anatomic integrity of the nerve; no nerve graft was necessary. Postoperative histology and immunohistochemical studies revealed features indicative of solid vascular leiomyoma. Conclusion Angioleiomyoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of geniculate ganglion lesions. Optimal postoperative facial function is possible only by preserving the anatomical and functional integrity of the facial nerve.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus