Limits...
Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

Zhang J, Liu YX, Ozdemir SK, Wu RB, Gao F, Wang XB, Yang L, Nori F - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium.We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs.In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan. jing-zhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

No MeSH data available.


Illustration for different multiple-access methods.(a) TDMA: the users share the same frequency at different time slots. (b) FDMA: different frequency bands are assigned to different data-streams. (c) CDMA: the entire spectrum is utilized to encode the information from all users, and different users are distinguished with their own unique codes. Each user in the network is represented by a different color.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713527&req=5

f1: Illustration for different multiple-access methods.(a) TDMA: the users share the same frequency at different time slots. (b) FDMA: different frequency bands are assigned to different data-streams. (c) CDMA: the entire spectrum is utilized to encode the information from all users, and different users are distinguished with their own unique codes. Each user in the network is represented by a different color.

Mentions: Popular multiple-access methods in classical communication networks include time-division multiple-access (TDMA), frequency-division multiple-access (FDMA), and code-division multiple-access (CDMA). See Fig. 1 for an illustration of different multiple-access methods. In TDMA, different users share the same frequency but transmit on different time slots, but timing synchronization and delays become serious problems in large-scale networks. In FDMA, different users share the same time slots but operate on different frequency bands. However, only a narrow band of the data transmission line has a low leakage rate and the bands assigned to different users should be sufficiently separated to suppress interference. Unlike TDMA and FDMA, CDMA utilizes the entire spectrum and time slots to encode the information for all users, while distinguishes different users with their own unique codes. Therefore, CDMA is adopted as the key technology of the currently-used third generation mobile communication systems, and can accommodate more bits per channel use25 compared with TDMA and FDMA. It has achieved great success in commercial applications of classical communications.


Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

Zhang J, Liu YX, Ozdemir SK, Wu RB, Gao F, Wang XB, Yang L, Nori F - Sci Rep (2013)

Illustration for different multiple-access methods.(a) TDMA: the users share the same frequency at different time slots. (b) FDMA: different frequency bands are assigned to different data-streams. (c) CDMA: the entire spectrum is utilized to encode the information from all users, and different users are distinguished with their own unique codes. Each user in the network is represented by a different color.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713527&req=5

f1: Illustration for different multiple-access methods.(a) TDMA: the users share the same frequency at different time slots. (b) FDMA: different frequency bands are assigned to different data-streams. (c) CDMA: the entire spectrum is utilized to encode the information from all users, and different users are distinguished with their own unique codes. Each user in the network is represented by a different color.
Mentions: Popular multiple-access methods in classical communication networks include time-division multiple-access (TDMA), frequency-division multiple-access (FDMA), and code-division multiple-access (CDMA). See Fig. 1 for an illustration of different multiple-access methods. In TDMA, different users share the same frequency but transmit on different time slots, but timing synchronization and delays become serious problems in large-scale networks. In FDMA, different users share the same time slots but operate on different frequency bands. However, only a narrow band of the data transmission line has a low leakage rate and the bands assigned to different users should be sufficiently separated to suppress interference. Unlike TDMA and FDMA, CDMA utilizes the entire spectrum and time slots to encode the information for all users, while distinguishes different users with their own unique codes. Therefore, CDMA is adopted as the key technology of the currently-used third generation mobile communication systems, and can accommodate more bits per channel use25 compared with TDMA and FDMA. It has achieved great success in commercial applications of classical communications.

Bottom Line: A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium.We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs.In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan. jing-zhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

No MeSH data available.